Letters to the Editor

Clinton’s illness and comment, teaching history, 9/11

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton gets into a van as she departs an apartment building Sept. 11, 2016, in New York. Clinton’s campaign said the Democratic presidential nominee left the 9/11 anniversary ceremony in New York early after feeling “overheated.” Her campaign later acknowledged that she had been diagnosed with pneumonia.
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton gets into a van as she departs an apartment building Sept. 11, 2016, in New York. Clinton’s campaign said the Democratic presidential nominee left the 9/11 anniversary ceremony in New York early after feeling “overheated.” Her campaign later acknowledged that she had been diagnosed with pneumonia. The Associated Press

Deceptive Clinton illness debacle

Re “Clinton has pneumonia, falls ill during 9/11 memorial service” (Page 1A, Sept. 12): As usual, when Hillary Clinton tries to tell the truth, it’s after she’s been caught in deception. On Sunday, she claimed to be overheated in the blistering 76-degree sun and stumbled while being loaded into a van.

Later, she emerged from her daughter’s apartment building looking chipper and noting, “I feel great; it’s a beautiful day in New York.” If you have pneumonia and get overheated, you wouldn’t say you feel great, unless you were being untruthful and deceptive.

Then, later that afternoon, the pneumonia card was played. Typical Clinton MO.

Tom Orsat, Folsom

Faux outrage against Clinton

Re “Trump backers pounce on insult from Clinton” (Page 4A, Sept. 11): Hillary Clinton was wrong when she said “you could put half of Donald Trump’s supporters in a basket of deplorables.” The percentage is much higher.

Polling shows that 60 percent of Trump supporters say Barack Obama, this nation’s first African American president, is a Muslim born in Kenya. Therefore, he was not legitimately elected. Is this not deplorable?

Trump’s own pollsters have said on many occasions that they believe the polls do not reflect an accurate sample of his voters. Their reasoning: When asked by pollsters who they prefer, they don’t want to admit they’re voting for Trump because they’re afraid they’ll be associated with a campaign steeped in racism and misogyny.

What’s deplorable is to pretend to be outraged at Clinton for saying the same thing your own campaign is saying.

Richard Nano, Roseville

Have we forgotten to be united?

How, in 15 years since Sept. 11, 2001, have we descended where we were that day, and how united we all were as a country? Where has the patriotism that we all experienced that day gone?

On that day, there were no political parties, or race, or religion, that divided us into “baskets.” How have we devolved from that united state into where we are now, less than two months from a national election?

I’ve watched the 9/11 shows, and I watch them every year to never forget. And I’m struck that this country has really changed since then, and not in a positive way.

I will not declare my political affiliation, or candidate of choice, but it’s becoming unbearable to watch, or even read about. How have we landed in this political climate in 15 years? Can anyone rationally explain this?

Linda Salon Bradford, Roseville

More purposes for teaching history

Re “Trump is right about teaching patriotism” (Viewpoints, Sept. 9): I enjoyed Ben Boychuk’s column but have a concern that teaching history to instill patriotism to all grades of public school is neither practical nor wise.

There are other worthwhile purposes for teaching history – especially in upper grades – that differ from strictly celebrating our past. While the warts-and-all approach to teaching U.S. history isn’t suitable for young children, if we want a knowledgeable electorate who knows that we have been misled into hasty actions before, then perhaps in high school we should temper the patriotic approach that America has always has been right.

Could it be that Donald Trump’s support from people without a college education could in part be because they have only been exposed to the patriotic approach to teaching history? They may think that since we were never wrong back when America was great, then the answer to today’s complex problems must be to “make America great again.”

Mike Meadows, Gold River

No front-page tribute to 9/11

I opened my Sacramento Bee on Sunday hoping to see a headline of “Lest We Forget” or some tribute to the lives lost on this day and – nothing. It was disheartening.

B.D. Miller, Sacramento

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