Letters to the Editor

UC divestment, N.C. shootings, Kings’ coach

Mohammad Abu-Salha, center, leads mourners in prayer over the caskets of his daughters Yusor Abu-Salha, 21, and Razan Abu-Salha, 19, and Yusor’s husband, Deah Barakat, 23, during a funeral service Thursday in Raleigh, N.C. The three were shot and killed in Chapel Hill, N.C., on Tuesday night.
Mohammad Abu-Salha, center, leads mourners in prayer over the caskets of his daughters Yusor Abu-Salha, 21, and Razan Abu-Salha, 19, and Yusor’s husband, Deah Barakat, 23, during a funeral service Thursday in Raleigh, N.C. The three were shot and killed in Chapel Hill, N.C., on Tuesday night. The Raleigh News & Observer

Divestment is not the answer

Re “Anti-Israel voting ripples across UC” (Page A1, Feb. 13): I am distressed by the recent votes on UC and other college campuses to divest from companies doing business with Israel. I would like to see two states living side by side in peace. But demonizing Israel, as the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement does, will not promote peace and not lead to a Palestinian state.

Divestment may be personally gratifying to some, but it gets in the way of a political solution. It obstructs the willingness to compromise that is fundamental to any negotiating process. Years ago, Palestinian academic Sari Nusseibeh said: “It is through cooperation based on mutual respect, rather than boycotts or discrimination, that our common goals can be achieved.”

Maybe those who are advocating for divestment ought to heed Nusseibeh’s wise words and change their focus to encourage the Palestinians and Israelis to construct a dialogue toward reaching a peace with dignity and security for all.

Judah Rosen, Citrus Heights

We are American too

The merciless murders of three Americans at Chapel Hill, N.C., are troubling. Wait, three Americans? Yes, they were Americans, born and raised, who happened to be Muslim.

Whether this brutality was a villainous hate crime, a response to a petty parking dispute or both remains undetermined, but it has sparked a necessary discussion on the intensifying anti-Muslim sentiment in our country. From the Rev. Franklin Graham to average citizens after watching “American Sniper,” more and more seem to view Muslims as barbarians or anti-American.

I, a Muslim and an American, extend my heartfelt condolences to the victims’ families. But here’s the deal: Many Muslims are in the United States for a reason – for the freedom it offers, for the equal opportunity it promises, for the democracy, diversity and unity. Some of us were born here and some of us are immigrants, but we love this country.

We are Americans, just like you.

Sajeel Malik, Berkeley

Shooting was a hate crime

Re “Muslims ask if religion was a factor in deadly shootings” (Page A6, Feb. 12): Anytime a person with a Muslim name commits a crime, Islam and terrorism become part of the headline. No one ever bothers to check if the perpetrator was a practicing Muslim or Muslim by name only. Islam is always maligned. In this case, the murdered girl had told her father about Craig Stephen Hicks having a problem with the way she looked as she wore the hijab. This was an execution. He murdered three young kids by executing them by shooting them in the head. This was a hate crime, and it should be prosecuted as a hate crime.

Mohammad Arshad, Sacramento

Different standards, same error

Re “Paris votes to sue Fox for damage to its reputation” (Page A8, Feb. 12): Why is there a different standard for reporters at major television networks (ABC, CBS and NBC) and reporters at Fox News?

Brian Williams’ credibility, past and future, is suspect because he exaggerated and lied once or twice after years of accurate reporting. It’s on the news for days and there are big articles in the press. Yet Fox’s reporter hypes the tragedy in Paris with false reports of no-go zones and Sharia law in France. Also the false report of Birmingham, England, being “totally Muslim.” These false reports were repeated often, exaggerated and sensationalized.

When Fox was threatened with a lawsuit, a half-handed apology was televised without fanfare: “some regrettable errors.” Williams gets full coverage on TV and in newspapers, but Fox’s lies get three paragraphs on Page A8. Why isn’t Fox held to the same standards?

A.D. Dopson, Elk Grove

Another Kings coach?

Re “Karl’s in charge” (Page A1, Feb. 12): I don’t follow basketball, but I see the headlines and scores of Kings’ games and it seems to me that changing coaches isn’t getting it done. Maybe they should fire the players and give a coach something to work with.

John Pope, Placerville

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