Letters to the Editor

‘Farm to fork,’ Clinton and Trump

Sacramento State student Amanda Wagenknecht sets stemware on a table on Guy West Bridge before the upcoming “farm to fork” dinner at the university. The proceeds of the $50-per-person dinner benefited the Associated Students Inc. Food Pantry on campus. Corporate involvement in the farm-to-fork movement has raised some hackles.
Sacramento State student Amanda Wagenknecht sets stemware on a table on Guy West Bridge before the upcoming “farm to fork” dinner at the university. The proceeds of the $50-per-person dinner benefited the Associated Students Inc. Food Pantry on campus. Corporate involvement in the farm-to-fork movement has raised some hackles. apayne@sacbee.com

‘Farm to fork’ with integrity

Re “Is city hurting the integrity of ‘farm to fork’ movement?” (Forum, Sept. 11): The Bee’s Sept. 15 photo highlighting Sac State’s “farm to fork” fundraiser for the student pantry is a partial response to Michelle Basso Reynolds and Steve Maviglio’s insightful article in the Forum section.

Slow Food Sacramento, Sacramento Homeless Organizing Committee and Oak Park Sol provided another with their third annual Farm to Every Fork dinner on Saturday. This fundraiser put the hungry and well-fed side by side to raise community commitment to end homelessness and hunger in our region. Both events featured nationally known speakers – Raj Patel (of “Stuffed and Starved”) and professor Angela Harris of UC Davis law school. Both volunteer-led, sold-out events are solid responses by the Sacramento community to the call for integrity.

Charity Kenyon, Galt

No hijacking of ‘farm to fork’

The Convention & Visitors Bureau pitches “farm to fork” sponsorship opportunities as a way to improve “your brand.” Farm to fork is not for sale.

Farm to fork should identify food deserts in our poorest communities and focus efforts to ensure that all Sacramentans have an opportunity to marvel in the many benefits of growing, harvesting, preparing and consuming one’s own food. Growing foods should be affordable for all, and not just the most fortunate or large corporate marketing budgets.

As a small backyard urban farmer who tries to feed his family as much homegrown food as possible, I refuse to let corporate sponsors dilute the message of striving for nutritious whole foods for all.

J.W.G. Livaich, Sacramento

Hack reveals some truths

Re “Hack reveals scathing Powell emails about Trump, Clinton” (Page 1A, Sept. 15): The hacking of Colin Powell’s email is unfortunate, but it has revealed his honest opinion and the true nature of Hillary Clinton. She is greedy, not transformational, and someone who messes things up because of her hubris (sense of superiority).

This close-up and personal description of Clinton from someone who says he respects her easily explains Clinton’s email problems, her pneumonia incident and her verbal flubs. We finally know what we are getting in our next president.

Eugene King, Sacramento

Playing with fire is new normal

Re “Conservatives play with fire” (Viewpoints, Sept. 13): Michael Gerson is right on when he concludes his column by saying Donald Trump’s motives previously were hidden by human decency. The new normal is that Trump has allowed the despicable to become acceptable.

Will Connell, Grass Valley

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