Letters to the Editor

LETTERS Clean energy, student loans, spanking debate, etc. ...

Asim Tahir, the integrated design program manager on Google’s real estate team, left, and Meghan Casserly, with Google public relations, check out the wind turbines near Livermore. Google has signed an agreement to buy power from NextEra Energy’s Golden Hills Project, that will help provide electricity to the Googleplex and the company’s data centers. The project will place old existing wind turbines with new, larger one.
Asim Tahir, the integrated design program manager on Google’s real estate team, left, and Meghan Casserly, with Google public relations, check out the wind turbines near Livermore. Google has signed an agreement to buy power from NextEra Energy’s Golden Hills Project, that will help provide electricity to the Googleplex and the company’s data centers. The project will place old existing wind turbines with new, larger one. Bay Area News Group

Visionaries lead the way

Re “Apple to build solar plant” (Business, Feb. 11) and “Google buys into clean energy” (Business, Feb. 12): Kudos to Apple and Google for announcing that they are moving forward on huge green energy projects to fuel their operations, Apple in solar and Google in wind. A significant portion of their energy will be supplied by these energy sources.

If only more American companies and politicians could take the forward-looking position of Tim Cook, Apple’s CEO, who stated, “We know that climate change is real. Our view is that the time for talk is past and the time for action is now,” then this country truly could move toward a carbon-neutral goal.

Apple and Google are proven innovators and see that carbon policies and laws, such as a federal carbon fee and dividend law in conjunction with state cap-and-trade policies, which hopefully will be fully enacted and eventually protect our environment, will impact future profits. I hope others will follow their vision.

Linda Klein, Rancho Murieta

Living within our means

Re “It’s a daily struggle to pay off student loans” (Viewpoints, Feb. 12): While I can appreciate the desire and difficulty of getting a degree in this day and age, I have to wonder why it is that the younger generation has always felt the need to get something, in this case a degree, when they can not afford it.

An undergraduate degree is understandable, but many of us from my generation had to wait until we could afford it before embarking upon a graduate degree. We all make choices, and we know going in that those choices may mean that we put off other things until we can afford it. Often that means working first and spending later.

Plan, save, spend and then repeat. It’s a lesson we learned from our Depression-era parents. Later generations need to learn a similar lesson.

Danny Delgado, Sacramento

It’s a daily struggle?

So many things come to mind when reading this commentary. Among them, the writer doesn’t mention that before getting a student loan you should consider if the degree you plan to obtain will provide a job that pays you commensurable for the loan amount that you take out.

For two smart people, they really have no clue about how to live a normal life. Senica Gonzalez and his wife have an extra $1,300 a month and live in a nice home paid for by his in-laws. That isn’t struggling. Use the money you are putting aside for health insurance and buy a car. Then start paying for health insurance. Temporarily stop giving 10 percent to charity and pay off your loans instead.

Gonzalez and Amy Carrillo need to learn about a word called “sacrifice.” It will allow them to live on their own and gain some much needed self-respect.

Bill Goll, Elk Grove

State should enter 21st century

Re “Rolling back the prison industry” (Viewpoints, Feb. 12): The shift from punishment and incarceration in California corrections is a welcome development but it’s hardly due to “hard science, objective data and innovative models that work.” Rather, it’s the direct result of a lawsuit filed by correctional activist attorneys.

The suit eventually required California to reduce the prison population by about 10,000 inmates, saving taxpayers billions. The state should be embarrassed that doing the right thing for taxpayers required a Supreme Court decision. A simple system analysis would have provided a rational basis for dealing with an increased correctional population and other correctional issues. The last correctional system analysis was in 1970. Whereas that analysis required a year of intense effort, the analysis today could probably be completed in a couple weeks with far more information being developed. Isn’t it about time for the state to move into the 21st century?

Rich McKone, Lincoln

IRS is far too powerful

Re “IRS apologizes for seizing small-business accounts” (Business, Feb. 12): Where will the abuses of power by IRS bureaucrats end?

Before Congress called for an end to the practice, the IRS had been seizing the bank accounts of small businesses that structured their banking transactions to avoid federal reporting requirements.

It’s high time to emasculate this agency. Will it just be a coincidence if I get audited soon?

Wes Hill, Sacramento

Housing and greed

Re “Building during a drought – what’s up with that? (Letters, Feb. 12): Gary Simuns’ letter to the editor asked: Why are we building new homes? The simple answer is greed. Greed by the state and local governments (more property taxes), greed by the builder, greed by the cities (permits). It matters not whether there is water enough for all.

Suzan Hunt, Lincoln

Parental barbarism in action

Re ‘Thank you, Pope Francis” and “You raise your children ... ” (Letters, Feb. 13): I am so tired of the “I spank my kids and I’m proud of it” parents who flood every available news outlet every time an article about spanking comes out.

They claim that it’s the only effective way to discipline kids, and as proof they point to the parents who don’t spank who have out-of-control kids, while conveniently ignoring the ones who have raised well-behaved kids without spanking.

Why are you not seeking those people out to find out how they do it instead of bragging about your barbaric discipline method?

Jo Ann Daugherty, Jackson

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