Letters to the Editor

LETTERS Water, drought, sales tax

A half-million Sacramento water users nearly lost their main water source last year when Folsom Lake levels dropped near “dead pool” level. Now, water managers say they have devised a plan to reduce the chance that Folsom Lake water will become inaccessible in future droughts.
A half-million Sacramento water users nearly lost their main water source last year when Folsom Lake levels dropped near “dead pool” level. Now, water managers say they have devised a plan to reduce the chance that Folsom Lake water will become inaccessible in future droughts. rpench@sacbee.com

Where will water come from?

Re “Group has plan to avoid Folsom Dam ‘dead pool’<TH>” (Page A1, May 3): If Sacramento Water Forum members “freaked out” last year when Folsom Lake approached “dead pool” levels, why on earth are the same cities that make up the Water Forum blindly going forward with massive expansion plans? The city of Folsom is charging ahead with a plan to develop thousands of new homes with 25,000 new residents in its recently annexed area south of Highway 50.

Just where do our city managers and water officials think all the water for the development will come from? If our water resources are stretched to the limit now, just how much do they think their existing residents can conserve in order to serve thousands of new customers?

It’s time for our city officials to stop pretending the future will simply take care of itself.

Nick Ferrari, Folsom

Water war begins

Re “Water cuts called unfair due to climate disparities” (Page A1, May 2): State officials who want people who live in the inland areas to rethink gardens to suit native conditions and to shift their attitudes about lawns typifies the high-handed attitude on the part of unelected government administrators. Because they find it “too incredibly complex” a process to adjust water allowances based on significant climate differentials, those who live in the inland areas must change their lifestyles and embrace a desert model. I suppose the green trees and plants have no benefit for moderating inland temperatures or adding oxygen and decreasing carbon dioxide or improving health issues.

Historians have noted repeatedly about government, that what they are given to administer, they soon begin to think they own. In California, unelected administrators are given control over our air and water, the two most critical resources for life. Perhaps it’s time for legislators to get their hands dirty and become accountable again.

Donald Schell, Sacramento

Water cuts and whiners

Message to water-cut whiners: We live in a state that is two-thirds arid to semi-arid, yet we plant mega-lawns with grass that transpires large amounts of water as vapor, as though we live where precipitation is plentiful. If you don’t like the desert vegetation that thrives here then please feel free to move to a location where the climate is more suitable to your choice in landscaping.

Carl Hauge, Sacramento

Stop the shenanigans

Re “Ploy reduces West Sac sales tax” (Our Region, May 2): Companies moving tax revenues to other jurisdictions to avoid or reduce sales tax payments is nothing new. The city of Lincoln in Placer County has been faced with this process for years by its two largest employers, lumber and pipe companies. The glaring problem is that our local and state legislators have simply failed to fight to keep the revenues here where the companies true “primary sales locations” are located.

The interests of the companies have always been put first by our local and state legislators. So, it is natural to expect these companies to take advantage of ineffectual local jurisdictions like Lincoln and Placer County, and dictate alternative “primary sales locations” to thwart the law and avoid Lincoln’s share.

Lincoln’s historical percentage and share of tax rates and revenues is considerably lower than our sister cities. We cannot support further shenanigans of this type.

Reginald Bronner, Lincoln

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