Letters to the Editor

Letters: What do homeless people in Sacramento really need?

Mayor talks investing in Sacramento neighborhoods, avoiding Seattle, S.F. pratfall

In their exclusive interview on homelessness in Sacramento, Mayor Darrell Steinberg tells Bee columnist Marcos Breton about the investments in local neighborhoods and avoiding the problems seen in "out of control" Seattle and San Francisco.
Up Next
In their exclusive interview on homelessness in Sacramento, Mayor Darrell Steinberg tells Bee columnist Marcos Breton about the investments in local neighborhoods and avoiding the problems seen in "out of control" Seattle and San Francisco.

They need a place

Summer inaction means homeless people will die in Sacramento this winter. Here’s why” (sacbee.com, Aug. 15): What do homeless people in Sacramento really need? What about our community? Homeless people need a place where they can stay safely that has sanitary and waste collection facilities. Our community needs to be able to take back control of our parkway and downtown areas, which can’t happen so long as homeless people have no alternative place to stay. The solution being offered is to construct permanent facilities at great expense in areas where they’re not wanted. Instead, why not use open land that can be fenced off where homeless people can pitch their tents near or even in the parkway? There could be regularly serviced portable toilets and dumpsters and seasonal warming areas, along with a nearby police presence at all times. Then we could resume enforcement of anti-camping laws, as well as provide a place where homeless people could live more safely and comfortably.

David O. McReynolds,

Fair Oaks

Not anti-Semitism

“Anti-Semitism from the left” (The Sacramento Bee, section 13A, Aug. 16): I disagree with the man quoted as saying “there is no difference between hatred of Israel and hatred for the Jews.” I criticize my country all the time, and I’m not anti-American. There’s much to criticize about Israel’s policies. I am not anti-Semitic by doing so.

Donna Reynolds,

Roseville

Why not Warren?

“Many Democrats love Warren, but they worry, too” (The Sacramento Bee, section 8A, Aug. 16): Sen. Elizabeth Warren would be a strong presidential candidate, someone who firmly believes in her message and can stand up to the bully-in-chief. As for a woman not being electable, the Democrats should nominate a woman as both president and vice president. A Warren/Kamala Harris or Warren/Stacy Abrams ticket would be powerful. It’s intriguing that voters have these concerns about Warren, particularly “that a woman cannot win in 2020.” Would these same voters have issue with a male candidate who went to Harvard? Do they think that Donald Trump won’t try to drown out whoever the Democratic nominee is?

David Kalb,

Davis

A public service?

Concerned by California Channel closure, lawmaker in talks to keep Capitol coverage on TV” (sacbee.com, Aug. 16): The demise of the California Channel is terrible! I watch it all the time. And not only the state Legislature, but the other programming, too. So much for public service by the cable companies. Is the local government channel next? C-SPAN? Shame on them.

Patricia Gayman,

Carmichael

Decision poses huge risk

Officers reduced at Sacramento City Unified schools as district renews police contract” (sacbee.com, Aug. 17): The Sacramento City Unified school board’s decision to reduce the number of law enforcement officers from eight to three and to not have them be stationed at specific schools is short sighted and puts students, teachers and personnel at risk. The district has already shown its inability to manage budgetary and financial matters. Are we willing to place the safety and security of our children and teachers in the hands of such incompetent and poor decision makers while they try figuring out what a “school safety director” position might look like?

Bill Motmans,

Sacramento

It’s the worst

Evil health care system” (sacbee.com, Aug. 21): I vehemently disagreement with John Hoge’s letter. Hoge states, “ Our health care system is one of the worst in the developed world.” He is far too kind. Surely, all indicators point to the inescapable conclusion that surely we have the distinction of providing the worst health care system in the “developed world.”

Gary Hexom,

Lincoln



Related stories from Sacramento Bee

  Comments