Letters to the Editor

Oil spill, voter turnout, smoking age, zoo admission

The Texas company whose ruptured pipeline created the largest coastal oil spill in California in 25 years had assured the government that a break in the line was "extremely unlikely" and easily detectable.
The Texas company whose ruptured pipeline created the largest coastal oil spill in California in 25 years had assured the government that a break in the line was "extremely unlikely" and easily detectable. AP

Oil industry is unsafe, period

Re “Oil spill inquiries show the need for real oversight” (Editorials, June 11): The lapses in oversight that surfaced following the oil spill in Santa Barbara are worrisome, but they’re not an anomaly for the oil and gas industry in California. Oil companies have a long history of spills, explosions and contaminating our state’s water and air – and that’s with some of the most stringent rules in the books.

Looking ahead to how we can prevent something like this from happening again, it is worth asking whether any amount of regulation will ever be enough to truly make these practices safe.

The track record shows the answer is no. And yet, the trend seems to be toward riskier and more dangerous industry practices. With stakes so high, we should be talking about real oversight in existing oil operations, but the real solution is to quickly wean ourselves off dirty fuels.

Ella Teevan, Oakland

Election officials don’t get it

Re “A promising plan to boost voter turnout” (Editorials, June 12): I’m unsure whether election officials don’t get it, or don’t care to get it. Voter apathy is not due to lack of access, but the loss of representative government. A vote no longer counts unless you’re associated with a special interest or dependent upon government for work or support.

Who or what party is elected no longer makes a difference. Government expands control, overwhelms private business and enriches those in government. This voter turnout plan is a fantasy in terms of representative government.

Robert Reark, Granite Bay

Smoking is bad and so is logic

Re “State could snuff out under-21 tobacco sales” (Insight, June 12): I agree that the smoking age should be raised to 21; it not only affects the people smoking but those around them. But Assemblywoman Susan Eggman stated that if we allow people to go fight for our country and vote at 18, they should be able to choose to smoke or not. Following that logic, she also could suggest that the drinking age be lowered to 18 as well.

Alice Schnaidt, Sacramento

City zoo is too expensive

Re “Public housing site faces major revamp” (Insight, June 11): Councilman Steve Hansen said that some children in the neighborhood live lives so disconnected that they have not even visited the city zoo a mile and a half away.

I beg to differ. They are disconnected from the Sacramento Zoo because of the prices: Child admission (ages 2-11) is $7.75, general admission (ages 12-64) is $11.75 and seniors have to pay $11.

Wesley R. Swanigan, Carmichael

EXTRA LETTERS ONLINE

Find them at:

sacbee.com/letters-to-the-editor

HOW TO SUBMIT

Online form (preferred):

www.sacbee.com/submit-letter

Other: Letters, P.O. Box 15779,

Sacramento, CA 95852

150-word limit. Include name, address and phone number. Letters may be edited for clarity, brevity and content.

  Comments