Letters to the Editor

Women under attack, trophy hunting, School bus hijacker

In this undated photo provided by the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Cecil the lion rests in Hwange National Park, in Hwange, Zimbabwe. Two Zimbabweans arrested for illegally hunting a lion appeared in court Wednesday, July 29, 2015. The head of Zimbabwe’s safari association said the killing was unethical and that it couldn’t even be classified as a hunt, since the lion killed by an American dentist was lured into the kill zone.
In this undated photo provided by the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Cecil the lion rests in Hwange National Park, in Hwange, Zimbabwe. Two Zimbabweans arrested for illegally hunting a lion appeared in court Wednesday, July 29, 2015. The head of Zimbabwe’s safari association said the killing was unethical and that it couldn’t even be classified as a hunt, since the lion killed by an American dentist was lured into the kill zone. AP

Women are under attack

Re “The sad pandering on Planned Parenthood videos” (Editorials, July 28): The Sacramento Bee got it right in its editorial. This attack and the effort by conservative extremists in Congress to defund Planned Parenthood is an attack on affordable reproductive health care for all women, not just on Planned Parenthood.

Planned Parenthood does more to reduce the need for abortions than any anti-abortion person with a hidden camera.

From contraception to accurate sexuality education and cervical and breast cancer screening, Planned Parenthood is the leading reproductive health care provider for low-income women.

This is nothing more than a politically motivated attack to end abortion and cut off women to vital reproductive health care. Let’s hope the Senate gets it right.

Nicole Stefko, Sacramento

Don’t parole kidnapper

Re “Governor allows parole for California school bus hijacker” (sacbee.com, July 30): One of the disgusting lowlifes who committed the 1976 Chowchilla kidnap-ransom crime is being granted parole. How can this travesty be allowed?

Three wealthy subhumans planned and carried out this crime because they were too lazy or too stupid to work for their money. Victims were buried alive and terrorized. Their parents experienced anguish that cannot be adequately described. One of the brothers already has been granted parole, and the last one will have a parole hearing this fall.

Is there no crime severe enough to warrant life in prison?

Ann Moore, El Dorado Hills

Trophy hunting must end

Re “Cecil the lion’s awful death should end trophy hunting” (Viewpoints, Aug. 4): The op-ed by Jennifer Fearing informing us of the local connection to trophy hunting – Paul Snider and Renee Snider and their attempts to promote trophy hunting by building an animal trophy museum next to the Auto Museum – points out what we can do to help reduce if not end barbaric, cruel, sadistic killing of large animals.

We can oppose the efforts to promote trophy killing. We can support companies such as Delta Airlines that have taken steps to not transport any more trophy killings. We can become informed of who the trophy hunters and trophy collectors are and not support their businesses.

We can become informed consumers to make sure we do not purchase or spend any money on products like ivory that have been obtained by the killing of endangered animals. We can ask our legislators to pass laws to make the sale, possession or display of animal parts obtained by trophy hunting to be illegal, criminally prosecutable, subject to large fines, and subject to seizure and destruction.

Joel Uher, Wilton

Extradite Cecil’s killer

Jennifer Fearing is quite right to suggest that we can honor Cecil’s memory by refusing to allow a mausoleum of endangered animals here in Sacramento. We also can honor Cecil’s memory by extraditing Walter Palmer to Zimbabwe so that justice can be served. Any human who inflicts such horrific pain on an animal and smugly grins over the dying animal 40 hours later needs to be brought to justice. This behavior must be condemned to the fullest extent of the law.

Sharon Quinsland, El Dorado Hills

Canned hunting is terrible, too

While our government may not be able to stop all African nations from profiting from trophy hunting by Westerners, it could shut down for good what is called “canned hunting” in the United States.

There exists more than 1,000 fenced-in shooting enclosures in America, where the caged animals are lured to feeding or drugged before being killed. Canned hunts include lions and other exotic or endangered animals obtained from breeders, dealers, auctions, and even zoos or circuses.

Born Free works with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to enforce protection for endangered species against canned hunting.

Michelle Kunert, Sacramento

EXTRA LETTERS ONLINE

Find them at:

sacbee.com/letters-to-the-editor

HOW TO SUBMIT

Online form (preferred):

www.sacbee.com/submit-letter

Other: Letters, P.O. Box 15779,

Sacramento, CA 95852

150-word limit. Include name, address and phone number. Letters may be edited for clarity, brevity and content.

  Comments