Letters to the Editor

It’s time to fix working conditions for teachers

School districts from around California interview teaching candidates at CSU Sacramento’s University Union ballroom. California is one of many states facing teacher shortages.
School districts from around California interview teaching candidates at CSU Sacramento’s University Union ballroom. California is one of many states facing teacher shortages. aseng@sacbee.com

Re “A teacher pipeline in need of repair” (Editorials, Aug. 23): As a California public school teacher with 28 years of experience who has recently retired, I think it is important to point out that pay is less important than working conditions.

I have seen a steady progression of students who are out of control and parents who blame the system for their child’s problems. I have had, in the last several years, fourth-graders who stood up and told me they weren’t going to obey simple instructions; second-graders who hid under desks or crawled across the floor; and third-graders who ran around the room yelling and waving their arms.

I have been blamed repeatedly that the student never had a problem, despite report card comments showing this to be an ongoing problem. When I sent a disruptive student to the office, I was told not to send that student again because she or he was too disruptive. I have had parents file formal complaints, only to have the principal told to solve the problem and never have the parent contact the district again.

Demanding that parents control their children and setting up systems to deal with disruptive students would go a long way toward fixing the looming teacher shortage.

David Davidson,

Sacramento

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