Letters to the Editor

Momentum builds on climate change

Nobel laureate Mario Molina speaks at Carbon Neutrality Initiative on the campus of the University of California, San Diego. At the two-day climate change summit at UC San Diego, researchers are discussing their blueprint for concrete action that the state and the world should take to tackle the problem.
Nobel laureate Mario Molina speaks at Carbon Neutrality Initiative on the campus of the University of California, San Diego. At the two-day climate change summit at UC San Diego, researchers are discussing their blueprint for concrete action that the state and the world should take to tackle the problem. The Associated Press

Momentum builds on climate change

Re “Catholic bishops urge climate deal” (Page 12A, Oct. 27): It was a tiny article, just two paragraphs. Not just Pope Francis, but also “Representatives from bishops’ conferences across the globe” are calling on negotiators from 196 countries meeting in December to finally reach effective agreements to combat climate change.

This year has seen a major shift among business leaders on finding solutions for climate change. In April, 43 CEOs from some of the largest international companies joined the chorus. In June, the six largest European oil companies, including Shell and BP, came on board. In July, we added 13 of the largest corporations in America, including Apple, Google and Walmart. In September, six of America’s largest banks, including Bank of America and Wells Fargo, joined the movement. Momentum gathers. Will politicians follow?

Harold Ferber, Elk Grove

No need to attack family man Ryan

Re “We all want family time” (Editorials, Oct. 24): We are accustomed to The Bee attacking Republicans for even the most trivial of items but you reached a new low in mocking Paul Ryan for wanting to spend time with his young children.

Only an editorial board on illegal drugs could draw a correlation between his family values and Californians getting 12 weeks paid family leave. Ryan works long hours during the week while his family is almost 1,000 miles away. He wants to spend part of the weekend with them. How does that compare with the average worker who sees their immediate family seven days a week?

Richard Shoemaker, Orangevale

Confiscating cash hurts homeless

Re “Homeless in Sacramento: A death on the streets” (Page 1A, Oct. 25): I find it deplorable that the authorities would jail Genny Lucchesi as well as confiscate her $6,600 cash and give her a check for that amount upon her release. With no bank account, no Social Security card, no ability to cash the check, she was left at the mercy of the street.

There is an industry that thrives on the homeless, the lawbreakers, the incarcerated. To the homeless, cash is security. Paper checks are not.

Ted M. Ball, Roseville

Helping homeless requires new vision

In Contra Costa County, we have been trying to open alternatives to the care facilities that many who are mentally ill see as worse than the street. We definitely want an alternative to jail.

Advocates need a groundswell of public support to begin an new era with a new vision of how to use our existing resources to help. Mental illness is not a behavior that needs to be corrected, but a disease that needs medical treatment.

Lauren Rettagliata, Danville

Keep Costco store out of Elk Grove

Re “Costco submits plans for big-box store in Elk Grove” (Business & Real Estate, Oct. 26): Despite the opinions of many Elk Grove officials, I do not believe that a Costco store opening would be a positive move for the city.

Costco sells eggs that come from suppliers who use battery cages to confine hens. The cages are so small that the birds are unable to spread their wings or move freely. They are so cruel that their use is illegal in the European Union and several U.S. states. Still, Costco refuses to change its practices. Earlier in the year, these terrible conditions were documented via undercover video at a Costco supplier.

Isn’t Costco supposed to be a socially responsible company? Apparently not. We do not need cruelty in Elk Grove.

Ilsa Hess, Sacramento

Filoli is not anyone’s backyard

Re “What’s the point of saving water?” (Letters, Oct. 28): Reader Cathy Grinsead has it all wrong. Filoli is a treasure owned by the National Trust for Historic Preservation, not the mystical 1 percent. It is supported by some 1,200 volunteers and more than 100,000 visitors enjoy it every year. Until her unwatered back lawn achieves such status she ought not to compare the two.

Harvey Swenson, Sacramento

State job titles - a pig with lipstick!

Re “State finds it hard to clean up job titles” (Page 2A, Oct. 28): Custodian, Armory Custodian, Correctional Facility Custodian, Museum Custodian, Janitor, Satellite Waging Facilities Janitor.....Each job title requires a specific application to be considered for a state custodial job. Why? Apparently to justify salary levels at each specific location. But a pig with lipstick is still a pig, so re-classify all these as "custodians" and pay them the same entry and promotional levels earned.

The biggest thing needing cleaning is our State Human Resources Managers for allowing job titles to become so complicated that the average job seeker doesn't realize he/she must file an application for each job title to be considered! Maybe HR is helping to keep California unemployment rates high?

Dave Mulvehill, Rancho Murieta

EXTRA LETTERS ONLINE

Find them at:

sacbee.com/letters-to-the-editor

HOW TO SUBMIT

Online form (preferred):

www.sacbee.com/submit-letter

Other: Letters, P.O. Box 15779,

Sacramento, CA 95852

150-word limit. Include name, address and phone number. Letters may be edited for clarity, brevity and content.

  Comments