Letters to the Editor

Letters ‘Mockingjay’, World War I, water recycling, homelessness

Could Hillary Clinton become the face of a bottom-up economic revolution like the one portrayed in “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1,” forcing the government to expand the middle class and see the economy through the lens of women?
Could Hillary Clinton become the face of a bottom-up economic revolution like the one portrayed in “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1,” forcing the government to expand the middle class and see the economy through the lens of women? The Associated Press

‘Mockingjay’ connection visible

Re “‘Mockingjay’ script offers tips for Hillary Clinton’s campaign” (Forum, Dec. 7): Yes, sometimes it’s beneficial to throw out the speech that was well prepared by yourself and your political team, and speak from the heart to what you’re feeling at that moment and show some emotional connection to your supporters.

But Hillary Clinton changing tactics can be seen as a political ploy. Katniss Everdeen showed an emotional connection with her sector and all of the capital when she made the choice to take her sister’s place in the Hunger Games. And from then on, she fought for her people and herself. Just because Clinton isn’t showing her emotions doesn’t mean she isn’t able to feel or relate to citizens and their wants and needs.

Sharnell Silas, Fair Oaks

WWII comparison flawed

Re “Pearl Harbor reminds us how little we’re sacrificing” (Editorials, Dec. 7): It is convenient, on the anniversary of one of America’s most tragic days, to draw comparisons to the war on terror, but the similarities are skin-deep. Terrorist acts may have started both wars, but the implications are completely different.

When the empire of Japan attacked, it and its allies possessed the perceived ability to invade our nation and end our way of life. No doubt today’s terrorists too would seek to end our way of living, but lack the ability to carry out an attack on the scale of those 20th-century empires. Americans know that, and it is why many of us opposed the Iraq war. To come to those same people and call them unpatriotic for not footing the bill for 2.6 million new veterans is an affront to our democracy.

Amanda Dilbeck, Sacramento

Homes should recycle water

Re “There’s no room for waste in the state water bond” (Editorials, Nov. 30): Reading the editorial made me realize that California should have better ways of spending its money toward improving our water resources. Instead of recycling water in our own households, it goes down the drain. If residents of Sacramento and other cities were able to get rebates for installing gray water systems in their households, state funding could be preserved for water resources and water supply.

Samantha Y. Williams, Sacramento

Homelessness worth tackling

Re “Leaders dither, homeless shiver” (Editorials, Nov. 23): While homelessness has been a consistent problem after the push for deinstitutionalization, other cities have been steadily eliminating the problem; Sacramento has not. Why haven’t we figured it out? Because we try to ignore the problem. This problem is affecting our businesses and tourism, our safety and peace of mind, and our spirit as a community. We need to start providing more mental health care and shelters. With a few small changes we can make a big difference. If we continue to do nothing, nothing will change.

Ken Truong, Sacramento

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