Letters to the Editor

Supreme Court picks, editorial cartoons, retail health clinics, etc.

Lenodra Kruger and newly appointed Justice Mariano-Florentino Cuellar, right, speak during Kruger's confirmation hearing to the California Supreme Court on Dec. 22, in San Francisco. The state panel confirmed another appointment by Gov. Jerry Brown, a move that likely tilts the conservative-leaning court further to the left. Kruger, 38, a deputy assistant U.S. attorney general, won unanimous approval by the three-member commission.
Lenodra Kruger and newly appointed Justice Mariano-Florentino Cuellar, right, speak during Kruger's confirmation hearing to the California Supreme Court on Dec. 22, in San Francisco. The state panel confirmed another appointment by Gov. Jerry Brown, a move that likely tilts the conservative-leaning court further to the left. Kruger, 38, a deputy assistant U.S. attorney general, won unanimous approval by the three-member commission. The Associated Press

Brown tilts court way left

Re “Brown court picks look to history” (Forum, Dan Morain, Dec. 28): Here we go again. Ivy League types for the Supreme Court of California. Gov. Jerry Brown wants activist judges who desire to legislate from the bench, which is not their job. These liberal judges will do whatever they can to circumvent the will off the people. Democrats have always wanted justices to legislate from the bench.

These appointments are nothing more than a move to tilt the court way left with activists. Sorry, folks, this is bad for California.

John Hein, Rancho Murieta

Golden cartoonist

Re “Getting into the swing of a golden state of mind” (Forum, Jack Ohman, Dec. 28): I feel Jack Ohman is one of the best investments The Bee has ever made. I enjoy his cartoons and look forward to his Sunday articles. Dec. 28 was no exception.

Keep up the good work, and please stay in Sacramento. Trust me, we will continue to have plenty of material for you.

Billy Barnes, Carmichael

Public health vs. retail clinics

Re “Retail clinics play an important role” (Viewpoints, Dec. 28): I am surprised the op-ed didn’t discuss the threat posed by retail clinics on the public health. Offering flu shots at big-box retailers goes well with public health practice. Allowing patients with contagious diseases such as influenza into groceries/pharmacies won’t be ideal given hundreds of people shop at those chains every day.

Hospitals provide health care while maintaining hygienic standards stipulated by public health agencies. We must find out how the retail clinics will follow those standards.

CJ Jawahar, Roseville

Number of cop deaths

Re “More accurate numbers needed in police deaths” (Letters, Dec. 28): Letter writer Bill White asked for numbers on police who were killed in the line of duty. In 2013, 76 law enforcement officers were killed in line-of-duty incidents; 27 were killed by felonious acts; 49 officers died in accidents, according to an FBI report in November. This was the lowest total reported by the FBI ever, going back to 1961.

This nation has enjoyed dropping crime rates for the last 30 years, yet the numbers of justified deaths by cop, as well as unjustified deaths in police custody, have all risen. Of course, this is a direct result of the besotting of our nation with semi-automatic weapons and the NRA wiping out background checks in states like Missouri.

Chris Ewing, Sacramento

Hayden wrong on Cuba

Re “New approach on Cuba holds much promise” (Forum, Dec. 21) and “Books, movies by Cubans offer a different take” (Another View, Dec. 28): I found it curious that The Bee let Tom Hayden write in support of Obama’s Cuban policy and its own editorial position. As Lloyd Billingsley points out, Hayden has not progressed much after actively supporting North Vietnam. Hayden has a thirst for notoriety and power, and a radical leftist bent.

Wealthy by his marriage to and divorce from Jane Fonda, he failed in runs for governor, senator, Los Angeles mayor and L.A. City Council. Hayden gives himself away by calling Alan Gross a “covert agent” while excusing the The Cuban Five spies, because they were “protecting Cuba’s security” – that’s what spies do – and he airily dismisses the brutality of Fidel Castro’s dictatorship as “the consolidation of power with all its contradictions.”

Diplomatic relations with dictators is not new for America. This one is to the Castros’ advantage.

Harvey Swenson, Sacramento

Naive on carbon fee

Re “Climate change puts disasters on steroids (Letters, Dec. 28): I don’t agree with the analogy of using steroids in baseball to that of climate change, but letter writer Michael Segor can’t be serious to think that “the best solution is a revenue-neutral carbon fee paid by fossil fuel producers and fully rebated to households” will be without cost to the end user of those energy sources.

The reality will be a greater increase in costs from the energy producers and a corresponding piece of the action to our ever-taxing government that ultimately will be borne by consumers. It’s only smoke and mirrors.

Mark Roberts, Loomis

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