Letters to the Editor

Letters: Dems cutting off their own noses

Democratic Rep. Ami Bera failed to receive enough support from activists to secure the Democratic endorsement for his re-election. The vote was 61 percent in favor of backing him to 39 percent opposed. Bera needed 70 percent of the vote to avoid further deliberation. The setback means the two-term congressman from Elk Grove will have to wait until the Feb. 28 state party convention to again seek the nomination.
Democratic Rep. Ami Bera failed to receive enough support from activists to secure the Democratic endorsement for his re-election. The vote was 61 percent in favor of backing him to 39 percent opposed. Bera needed 70 percent of the vote to avoid further deliberation. The setback means the two-term congressman from Elk Grove will have to wait until the Feb. 28 state party convention to again seek the nomination. MCT

Dems cutting off their own noses

Re “Dems deny Bera: he’ll try again soon” (Capitol & California, Feb. 1): So local Democrats failed to endorse Rep. Ami Bera for re-election in a deeply divided district, thereby giving at least tacit support to his only current challenger, Republican Scott Jones. It’s especially head-scratching that one of Bera’s sins was voting to advance a trade agreement proposed by our Democratic president.

As a registered Democrat I’m a little confused because we clearly need to retain and, hopefully, increase our numbers in Congress. Somehow this just doesn’t seem like the best way to go about meeting that objective. Talk about cutting off your nose to spite your face.

On the bright side, at least my party is not giving the Republicans a lock on goofiness this year.

Marsha Holmes, Elk Grove

Democrats acting like tea party zealots

I’m having a difficult time seeing the real difference between tea party zealots and their counterparts in the Democratic Party in California. Consider the statement by Robert Longer of the Communications Workers of America Local No. 9421: “I think Congressman Bera needs to do some soul searching as to whether he’s a real Democrat, or not.”

What exactly is that supposed to mean? Would Longer rather have another Dan Lungren as his congressman?

Robert A. Dell’Agostino, Sacramento

False impression on Clinton emails

Re “Clinton pushes back as emails deemed ‘top secret’” (Page 1A, Jan. 30): Hillary Clinton did nothing wrong, but you have to read deep into the article to find that the emails in question were sent to her and not by her, and were not marked classified at the time they were sent.

Judy James, Newcastle

Dan Walters correct regarding Kamala Harris

Re “Harris ducks big betting bill” (Insight, Jan. 29): In his column, Dan Walters expressed what I’ve been thinking for many months: Attorney General Kamala Harris is avoiding controversial decisions because she is running for higher office.

I am strongly averse to electing a new U.S. senator when the candidate has only shown talent for political correctness and a preference for issue-avoidance. California and America need leaders to occupy these powerful positions, with fully developed viewpoints and the courage of their convictions.

As Walters stated, someone along the lines of Sen. Dianne Feinstein should be the model.

Fred Baucom, Sacramento

Almond crops gain; fish lose

Re “Price slump puts a twist in Valley’s almond boom” (Page 1A, Jan. 31): The increase in almond acreage from 590,000 acres in 2005 to 890,000 acres in 2015 is very alarming considering that California was in a drought much of this time. While Gov. Jerry Brown called on urban residents to reduce their water use by 25 percent, wealthy almond growers like Stewart Resnick of Paramount Farms in Kern County increased their almond acreage.

The 3 million acre-feet of water that farmers apply annually to the almond trees is the equivalent of three Folsom Lakes when full. As the Bureau of Reclamation and the California Department of Water Resources emptied Folsom, Oroville, Shasta and Trinity reservoirs to export water to corporate agribusiness, Delta smelt, longfin smelt, winter and spring-run Chinook salmon and other fish species moved closer and closer to extinction.

The state and federal governments sacrificed fish populations and the public trust so an elite group of wealthy almond growers could make a huge profit.

Dan Bacher, Sacramento

Disappointed in MSG’s comeback

Re “Chefs’ secret: MSG, wrongly maligned for years, has made a quiet comeback” (Feats, Jan. 31): I am very disappointed that some of Sacramento’s chefs are using MSG. I can’t eat food with MSG due to a food allergy/sensitivity. My allergist says to just stay away from food with that ingredient because if I eat it very often the reaction gets more severe.

I don’t understand chefs. They talk about real food from local gardens, along with local beef, pork, chicken and fish, and then they add MSG. The food is good already.

I would like for them to think about adding on their menus which foods contain MSG. That way I can still enjoy their restaurants on occasion. I am sure I am not the only one with objections to MSG. They might consider why restaurants stopped using it years ago.

Louise Einspahr,

Sacramento

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