Letters to the Editor

Letters: Sexting law, El Niño, daylight savings, Trump

Bret Meuli, the principal at Canon City High School in Colorado, where more than 100 students at the high school were apparently exchanging nude pictures, calls up an app to show what students are using to hide photos on their cellphones, in Canon City, Colo., in November. Concerned by a practice he’s said is becoming more prevalent in schools, a California lawmaker is carrying a bill that would let schools suspend or expel kids for so-called sexting – sharing explicit pictures and recordings via electronic message.
Bret Meuli, the principal at Canon City High School in Colorado, where more than 100 students at the high school were apparently exchanging nude pictures, calls up an app to show what students are using to hide photos on their cellphones, in Canon City, Colo., in November. Concerned by a practice he’s said is becoming more prevalent in schools, a California lawmaker is carrying a bill that would let schools suspend or expel kids for so-called sexting – sharing explicit pictures and recordings via electronic message. The New York Times file

Don’t criminalize teen behavior

Re “State bill targets students sending nude, sexy photos on their cellphones” (Page 1A, Feb. 27): Adolescence is a stressful and anxious time for teens as well as their parents. Teens are testing boundaries, making their way, coming into their own as people. Part of this exploration has to do with their sexuality.

Assemblyman Ed Chau, D-Arcadia, wants to teach teens a lesson by criminalizing this behavior. Teen sexuality is an uncomfortable subject to discuss, but it is something that parents and teens need to talk about, parents giving guidance and letting teens find their path.

Parents don’t need Chau or any elected official imposing their morality on us as adults or interfering on how we raise our teens. Granted, sexting is just a different form of experimentation by teens, but do we need to traumatize these kids during an already difficult time of their lives?

Michael Santos, Antelope

Another anemic rainy season

Re “El Niño could turn into a dud for state” (Page 1A, Feb. 25): Two years in a row weather experts, climatologists and meteorologists have been predicting that El Niño could provide some drought relief for California during the winter months.

Last year El Niño was called El Wimpo and now El Niño is being dubbed a dud. With all the knowledge and computers and modeling tools, one would expect the experts to get it right instead of getting people’s hopes up. So far the Sacramento region has received less precipitation than in 2015. We have a better chance with the Farmers’ Almanac.

Steve Mawhinney, Roseville

Time change causes problems

Re “Daylight saving time could end in California” (Capitol & California, Feb. 25): I could argue either side on daylight savings depending on who was picking up the bar tab. But I do care that California not go it alone. Any decision to go off the standard should be a national, not state, decision despite that a handful of states have opted out.

Consider the disruption to firms and doing business nationally and internationally, flight and other interstate transportation schedules, broadcasting, etc. We often get so wrapped up in California “specialness” that we forget we are but a small part of the country and world and that unilateral action such as this will come with a boatload of unanticipated inconveniences.

Roy Hecteman,

El Dorado Hills

Three Stooges: The GOP sequel

Re “Christie endorses Trump as Rubio slings barbs” (Page 1A, Feb. 27): Some people said that things would get worse in the country if Barack Obama became president.

I guess they were right because look what we have now in the race to succeed him. A major political party offers the country the kings of slapstick, the Three Stooges. Only their names are now Trump, Cruz and Rubio.

Eugene Wytrykus, Lincoln

He’s a Punch and Judy showman

Donald Trump responded to protesters at one of his rallies by saying he wants to “punch them in the face.” I’m not advocating violence, but why hasn’t someone punched him in the face? He truly deserves it.

Powell Svendsen,

Rancho Murieta

Poor choices don’t deserve a vote

The way things are going in the presidential primaries, it becomes obvious that the November ballot for president options should read: “None of the above.”

Tim Sawdey, Lincoln

A slippery electronic slope

If the FBI has its way in compelling Apple to develop software that helps the FBI break into the San Bernardino killers’ cellphones, the next step will be the theft of this software for sale to hackers and/or terrorists.

Add to this list those corporations and countries out to steal intellectual assets. Yes, there are countries that would like to bring the United States to an electronic halt or completely destroy its infrastructure.

Larry Dorshkind,

Redwood City

This is entertainment?

I cannot understand America’s ravenous appetite for graphic cinematic violence.

I saw “The Revenant” and was repulsed by its horrific portrayals including a man, Leonardo DiCaprio, being buried alive. It’s almost as if director Alejandro González Iñárritu is doing his best to offend the viewer’s sensibilities. By film’s end human dignity has been assaulted by every means imaginable including a vicious bear mauling, an arrow through the neck, and rampant bloodlust.

I concede to having a short threshold for violence, but is this kind of degradation what American audiences call entertainment? Looks like it since the director and leading actor were awarded Oscars.

Craig Steiger, Grass Valley

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