Letters to the Editor

Nursing homes, mayoral candidates, Katehi’s duty

Barbara Trigueros assumed the care for her mother, Emma Davidson-Pugh, after taking her out of a suburban Los Angeles nursing home. The family is suing the home, Glendora Grand, alleging Davidson-Pugh fell repeatedly and left the facility in her wheelchair unsupervised.
Barbara Trigueros assumed the care for her mother, Emma Davidson-Pugh, after taking her out of a suburban Los Angeles nursing home. The family is suing the home, Glendora Grand, alleging Davidson-Pugh fell repeatedly and left the facility in her wheelchair unsupervised. rpench@sacbee.com

A disturbing report on nursing homes

Re “A ‘dangerous mix’<TH>” (Page 1A, April 03): Sacramento Bee reporters Marjie Lundstrom and Phillip Reese have done an excellent and thorough job of investigative journalism about patient levels in skilled nursing facilities. Who knew that the facilities were increasingly being populated by non-elderly and potentially problematic patients: those with mental issues, drug users, and those who are just out of prisons?

Let’s consider that there are basically no California mental hospitals anymore and that now some of the nursing homes will apparently take in anyone in order to get their allotment from Medi-Cal or Medicare. And concurrently, there is a huge lack of low-rental housing, so indigents discovered that they can get room and board in nursing homes, if they have appropriate medical coverage.

This is just another example of the homeless epidemic. The ongoing homeless element is of course a huge problem, and apparently some of them are finding nursing homes to be a current refuge.

Melanie Kinkead,

Sacramento

Great article on nursing homes

Marjie Lundstrom and Phillip Reese did a great job pulling tons of information together into a very understandable and informative article on a very difficult topic. I am currently helping my 91-year-old former neighbor to get from nursing care back into her assisted-living facility. I think she is receiving very good care, but in a small way I think that by signing in at the facility every day I help send a message that she is a VIP.

Bob Smart,

Diamond Springs

Let’s talk about realities in Sac

Re “Intensity absent in mayoral election” (Local, April 3): Apparently columnist Marcos Breton thinks Sacramento should be like the Republican primaries. I for one am glad our mayoral race has not been splashed all over the headlines with “she said, he said”; we’re a much better city than that. I think it’s The Sacramento Bee’s fault for not doing a better job covering the candidates or talking more about the issues readers care about.

Why isn’t it a bigger story that we have the opportunity to have the most qualified mayor in the history of Sacramento in Steinberg? Or that homelessness and mental health are the centerpiece of his campaign – an issue no one else dares campaign or work on?

Sacramento has suffered from no one talking about these issues, and it’s clear when you see it in our neighborhood. It’s what we actually care about – not the petty she-said-he-said stuff.

Dagmar Darwish,

Sacramento

Let’s ask the tough questions

Voters and the local media need to start asking the difficult questions of Sacramento mayoral candidates. As two of the candidates are running million-dollar campaigns, it’s worth asking what their campaign donors expect from city government in return for their generosity.

Questions regarding the candidates’ records in elective office and in their current and previous careers are also fair game. More importantly, the candidates need to articulate their respective visions for Sacramento. Sacramento is becoming a more expensive place to live and to do business due to substantial increases in housing costs, utility rates and parking fees.

It’s worth asking how the candidates will address a city government that in recent years has operated under an ethical cloud due to workplace harassment allegations, improper use of city resources, and behested donations. A robust, citywide dialogue on the expectations of Sacramento’s next mayor should enable the best candidate to emerge.

Jason Orta, Sacramento

Katehi’s fiduciary duty to UC

Re “UC Davis students march to pressure Katehi to step down” (Local, April 2): At $424,360 a year plus a free house, car allowance and a generous health and retirement benefit package, Chancellor Linda Katehi clearly has a fiduciary duty to UC Davis and its students.

Question: Did Katehi uphold that fiduciary duty to the university and its students while serving on the board of John Wiley & Sons by taking affirmative steps to reduce the exorbitant cost of college textbooks, obtain significant discounts for the UC system and work to provide electronic copies online for free or at a greatly reduced cost?

If so, she should be commended for her efforts and has earned the right to remain in both capacities. If she did not, then she has abandoned her fiduciary responsibilities to UC and its students, and should resign.

Chris Smith, Rocklin

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