Letters to the Editor

Letters: Goldman Sachs, traffic tickets, low wages, Trump’s contributions

Many of the charitable gifts that Donald Trump cited to prove his generosity were free rounds of golf, given away by his courses for charity auctions and raffles. The largest items on the list were land-conservation agreements to forgo development rights on property Trump owns.
Many of the charitable gifts that Donald Trump cited to prove his generosity were free rounds of golf, given away by his courses for charity auctions and raffles. The largest items on the list were land-conservation agreements to forgo development rights on property Trump owns. Associated Press

Here’s a plan for Goldman Sachs

Re “$5 billion deal is great, but score isn’t settled” (Editorials, April 12): The Sacramento Bee’s editorial board is correct in saying that the score isn’t settled. From the beginning, the point has been missed that there are many homeowners who lost a tremendous amount of equity in their homes due to the mortgage meltdown.

Some of us stayed in our homes, never missed a payment and are still waiting for the investment that we lost to come back. What should have happened is the lenders should write down all mortgages based on the percentage of equity/value that has been lost.

Obviously, the big banks can afford this. Even after the fines, they are still raking in huge profits. It is time to address the loss suffered by every homeowner, not just those who got themselves into bad mortgages.

Katy Pridy, Jackson

Tickets deserved for law breakers

Re “Report: Traffic stops hit minorities harder” (Capitol & California, April 11): Jeremy B. White’s article about traffic stops suggests a portion of Carmichael and south Sacramento have proportionately higher traffic tickets written to Latinos and African Americans. They get the tickets because they deserve them.

If a DUI checkpoint stops a driver who can’t produce a valid license, registration and proof of insurance, a ticket is earned. I’ll bet the people in those areas are happy to see law enforcement in their neighborhood controlling law breakers.

If you don’t abide by the law, get off the road, but don’t blame police for profiling since they should patrol where more crime, accidents and emergencies occur.

Dave Mulvehill,

Rancho Murieta

Low wages similar to slavery

Re “America’s pockets of extreme poverty are getting worse” (The Numbers Crunch, April 9): The harangues against raising the minimum wage are exasperating, yet revealing, of the prejudicial dogmas that survive the generations.

The Old South long bellowed that its economy couldn’t exist without slavery – until it did. The grand-stepchild of that nonsense is wage slavery, a more acceptable, if not subtle, bondage for today’s poor.

The service industries and restaurant chain employers are not mom-and-pop enterprises, but corporations with well-compensated management and shareholders expecting dividends. Their employees, many of whom in this economy will spend their lives there, deserve adequate compensation.

Spencer P. Le Gate,

Sacramento

Small business deserves focus, too

Trying to recruit and retain members is always challenging for nonprofit organizations. I recently looked at reasons given by those who dropped membership in our organization, California Foundation for Fiscal Responsibility, since 2008 for ideas on what we can do better.

I was startled to discover the top reason given for dropping membership was financial hardship. Many are no longer in business. I could feel the pain of economic failure just by reading their notes. Even our largest former members – Campbell Soup, Chevron, Farm Bureau – recently dropped membership due to belt-tightening policies.

Small businesses are becoming extinct. Large businesses are teetering, too. Lawmakers should focus equally on workers and employers when considering minimum wage increases and expensive labor law regulations.

Marcia Fritz, Orangevale

president, California

Foundation for Fiscal Responsibility

What about Clinton’s charities?

Re “Trump’s charity comes from his foundation, not his pockets” (Page 1A, April 11): I am not a Trump supporter, but now that The Bee has printed a hit peace on Donald Trump’s charity contributions written by The Washington Post, when can I expect to see a similar article about Hillary Clinton’s contributions, which also come from foundations?

James Ezell, Folsom

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