Letters to the Editor

Police, racism, marches, responsibility, State Fair

President Barack Obama raises hands with Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings along with Michelle Obama and Micki Rawlings during an interfaith memorial service in Dallas on Tuesday for five law enforcement officers killed in an ambush at a Black Lives Matter rally.
President Barack Obama raises hands with Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings along with Michelle Obama and Micki Rawlings during an interfaith memorial service in Dallas on Tuesday for five law enforcement officers killed in an ambush at a Black Lives Matter rally. The Dallas Morning News

Police should be held accountable

Whenever a police officer is killed on duty, it is a tragedy but no more so than the unnecessary slaying of a citizen by police. Both are criminal acts. Yet, if we criticize any police actions, we are branded as anti-police and guilty of blaming all law enforcement for the actions of a few.

With the proliferation of smartphones, we are witnessing more questionable police interactions with the public. There are legitimate concerns about racism and overreaction by the police. When cops are held accountable and ordinary citizens of all races are treated with respect and dignity instead of hostility, then, perhaps, public trust can be restored. But until police attitudes and policies change, and there is justice for victims of illegal police actions, don’t expect the current outrage to end.

Harry A. Kreigh,

Sacramento

Why is there still racism in America?

It is intriguing to me to realize that this country continues to be accused of racism after electing a black president twice and spending billions of tax dollars on the black community. I think most people who voted for President Barack Obama thought that he would further the idea of a “melting pot” of humanity.

Instead we have become a “salad bowl” of different and separate ingredients, fostered by the divisive titles of African American, Mexican American and Muslim American.

What happened to just being American?

Karen Cochran, Roseville

Peaceful march brings us together

Re “Third rally held in response to killings” (Local, July 11): As of late, tensions between law enforcement officers and the black community have manifested themselves in the form of horrific violence on both sides, from the killing of five officers in Dallas to that of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge, La., and Philando Castile in St. Paul, Minn. The peaceful protest in Sacramento, however, moved the two sides closer together as cops and protesters offered mutual support to one another.

In light of recent heartbreaking tragedies, these peaceful gatherings are the first step toward ending the conflict as each side recognizes that there are a few bad apples in each, but the vast majority all seek the same end to violence.

Matthew Grehm, Rocklin

Not responsible for their actions?

Re “Mortgage crisis aftershocks still rattle Valley” (Editorials, July 13): The Sacramento Bee editorial board apparently supports people not paying their debts, which in turn results in higher costs for others.

The second paragraph says it all: “People bought homes they could not afford at inflated prices.” Why should others incur higher interest rates for people who bought something they could not afford?

In the majority of cases these people opted for several years of minimal payments, fully knowing that balloon payments would be due. They all thought they could capitalize and either refinance when their home grew in value or they would sell and make a huge profit. They were all willing to assume the risk.

Now the editorial board and others would forgive them, for they know not what they do. Like many other things in life, people today expect and often demand that they not be held responsible for their own actions.

Lennie Chancey, Roseville

Great job with the State Fair

The breweries and craft beers were excellent at the California State Fair. But a bigger issue is what a great job the fair folks did this year. Kids day. Kind of scary for Grandpa.

I could not believe how clean and organized everything was. Kiddie rides. Then on to the modest ag exhibits. The farm in the back was fantastic. Then on to Butler’s big carnival. Amazing high school crafts. Dancers. And the bathrooms were clean and stocked. Good job, folks.

Jeff Nicholas, Sacramento

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