Letters to the Editor

Dinner tickets, Sanders’ goals, youth vote, racism

With tickets for the Tower Bridge dinner being made available through a lottery, your chances of landing one is not very good ... unless you’re very friendly with one of the corporate sponsors. And, there are a lot fewer tickets available to the general public. Last year there were 250 tickets for the general public, this year 110.
With tickets for the Tower Bridge dinner being made available through a lottery, your chances of landing one is not very good ... unless you’re very friendly with one of the corporate sponsors. And, there are a lot fewer tickets available to the general public. Last year there were 250 tickets for the general public, this year 110. rbenton@sacbee.com

Youth vote could determine future

Re “This is the year to vote, millennials” (Editorials, July 14): In England, 73 percent of 18- to 24-year-olds voted to remain in the European Union, but they voted in small numbers. Older people voted to leave, and the youth will have to live with the consequences for much longer.

On issues like climate change, youth face the same problem. Younger Americans overwhelmingly support taking action to curb the climate consequences they’ll have to live with, but older voters tend to favor the status quo, and vote in larger numbers.

In this election, the differences between the candidates on climate change could not be more stark. Youth must turn out to vote so that they choose the climate they live with.

Dana Nuccitelli,

West Sacramento

Racism in U.S. has gotten worse

Re “Why is there still racism in America?” (Letters, July 14): Karen Cochran is correct. The country is set on pointing out the different races when referring to anything. We are Americans, and until we voted for a black president we were doing very well in taking care of all of our people.

We were mostly getting along. How many decades have we gone backward in the last eight years? I only hope we can recover before I am no longer here.

Candace Krumpe,

Carmichael

Who’s adding fuel to racial fires

Re “A poor choice, Sheriff Jones” (Insight, July 12): I couldn’t help but notice that while Erika Smith was accusing the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department, and Sheriff Scott Jones in particular, of “playing with fire” and accusing them of placing a “dubious opinion piece” from the Wall Street Journal and “peddling to the public” copies of the op-ed in the departments’ lobby how her own words seem to be the gasoline fueling its own fire.

She wrote that the opinion piece was full “of debatable and statistically misleading facts.” And then she quotes her own statistics and facts without revealing the source. Who knows if her facts were debatable and statistically misleading?

It wasn’t the best call to place those brochures in the lobby. But I think that’s a stretch to blame the entire Sheriff’s Department and Jones.

Nancy Gould, Sacramento

Sanders goals adopted by Dems

Re “Clinton gets long-sought endorsement by Sanders” (Page 1A, July 13): My own hearing was lost to the scream of lumber mill saws, though it is others, even some pundits at The Sacramento Bee, who turned a deaf ear to Bernie Sanders’ clearly enunciated campaign objectives and rather chose to define him by tiresome ribs about his age and mental state.

His critics were sure they were hearing the ramblings of a political throwback, a frumpy and grumpy grandpa, wildly ego-driven for staying in the race beyond his long overdue expiration date.

But slipping in under their noses and faulty analysis, Sanders, while conceding the battle, stood firm and won the war. He achieved his goals and legacy, nailing down many of his own Democratic Party planks and letting Hillary Clinton fight the more difficult and thankless job – just as he intended.

We 74-year-old geezers always get the last laugh.

Spencer P. Le Gate,

Sacramento

Let them eat cake, or crumbs

Re “Tower Bridge dinner changes ticket sales to lottery format” (Page 4A, July 13): I was excited to read that the Tower Bridge dinner was going to a lottery format. Then I read the fine print: price increases, fewer seats for regular people – by more than half. The Convention and Visitors Bureau is really doing us a favor – NOT.

The reason stated is that this is a fundraiser to pay for other free events for the masses. I’ll bet that the masses, given the opportunity, would buy enough tickets to raise the same amount of money for other events. Again, the sponsors and elites will dine in style in a near-exclusive event. Maybe they’ll leave crumbs.

Steve Schnaidt,

Sacramento

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