Letters to the Editor

Trump, Republican convention

For some readers, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has strong leadership capabilities that many Americans are hungry for. Others are fearful of Trump or don’t think he has conservative values.
For some readers, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has strong leadership capabilities that many Americans are hungry for. Others are fearful of Trump or don’t think he has conservative values. Associated Press

Trump makes strong points

Re “The Take” (Sacbee.com, July 22): The Bee’s editorial board writes an angry Donald Trump yells at the nation. He emphatically wants to make his points about Hillary Clinton’s bad judgment, growing ISIS terror, keeping America safe, better trade deals, bad Iran nuclear deal, Obamacare, etc. Trump has strong leadership capabilities that many Americans are hungry for, yet you folks nit-pick about minor things.

Doug Hinchey, Lincoln

A four-day fear fest

Re “Trump vow: America first” (Page 1A, July 22): I’ve just finished watching the four-day fear fest that was the Republican convention, and I’ve come to understand that Republicans are a very frightened group indeed.

From what I saw, Republicans are afraid of Muslims, immigrants, LBGTs, people of color, poor people, sick people, Asians, liberals and the government. I could go on, but the sad fact is that the only things Republicans are not afraid of are white, Christian, gun-toting conservatives. No wonder Donald Trump, unfettered by facts, has been able to drill into that well of fear and come up with a gusher of hate and bigotry.

This is a huge departure from the party I grew up with. Republicans in the past led by the likes of Lincoln, Roosevelt, Eisenhower and Reagan did not succumb to fear. Like the Donald, I too long for the days when America was great and the Republican Party had a spine.

Richard Hanson, Carmichael

Is Trump a false prophet?

In his acceptance speech Donald Trump seemed to describe America as being in horrible shape, and himself as the only one who can fix it. He spent time on violence in America but failed to mention gangs in America, a major source of crime and violence. According to Huffington Post, 80 percent of gun homicides in America are gang-related. I believe he also failed to say anything about right to life, an important issue to many, including me. I worry a bit about Trump being a loud contemporary false prophet.

John West, Sacramento

A potentially fatal error

Watching the Republican National Convention leads me to question whether the American electorate has the intelligence and critical thinking skills necessary to maintain a democratic form of government. Other countries that have ceded power to narcissistic, jingoistic megalomaniacs have always regretted it. For the United States to make this mistake in the era in which the president has the ability to initiate a nuclear war could prove to be a fatal error, not just for American democracy, but for all of humanity.

Bill Durston, Gold River

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