Letters to the Editor

Spaying and neutering: An antidote to dog bites

Sacramento resident Moyses Baldizan’s insurance company said it would no longer provide coverage because of his pit bull is too risky to insure.
Sacramento resident Moyses Baldizan’s insurance company said it would no longer provide coverage because of his pit bull is too risky to insure. hamezcua@sacbee.com

Re “Dog lovers feel bite of rejection” (Business, Feb. 8): Pit bulls can’t win. They are the most common type of dog entering Sacramento area animal shelters. And now, people interested in adopting pit bulls or pit bull mixes are being denied homeowners insurance because this type of dog is often involved in dog bite claims.

Spaying and neutering can help alleviate this conundrum. First, spaying and neutering can reduce aggression. Unaltered dogs are more likely to display dominance, territorial and protective aggressive behavior. Yet, 84 percent of dogs involved in biting incidents over a 10-year period were not spayed or neutered, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association in December 2013. Second, spaying and neutering will reduce the flow of pit bulls into our shelters, where they are difficult to adopt.

Options for low-cost spay/neuter exist in the Sacramento area, and anyone who owns a pit bull should pursue them.

Alexis Raymond, Sacramento

EXTRA LETTERS ONLINE

Find them at:

sacbee.com/letterstoeditor

HOW TO SUBMIT

Online form (preferred):

www.sacbee.com/sendletter

Other: Letters, P.O. Box 15779,

Sacramento, CA 95852

150-word limit. Include name, address and phone number. Letters may be edited for clarity, brevity and content.

  Comments