Letters to the Editor

Prop. 64 and pot DUI, transgender operation, Bera case, Broadway dining

Seattle police Officer Mike Lewis is part of a group of more than 200 law-enforcement personnel across the state who have been specially trained to spot and evaluate motorists impaired by drugs and alcohol.
Seattle police Officer Mike Lewis is part of a group of more than 200 law-enforcement personnel across the state who have been specially trained to spot and evaluate motorists impaired by drugs and alcohol. Seattle Times

Will Prop. 64 improve state?

Re “Bumper crop of pot cash” (Insight, Aug. 30): I think Foon Rhee is dead on target when he writes that “California’s marijuana market is projected to mushroom from $2.7 billion in 2015 to $6.5 billion by 2020 if recreational pot becomes legal,” and “a lot of people are poised to make a lot of money.”

Whenever I’m deciding whether to vote “yes” or “no” on a particular proposition, I always ask myself in what way the passage or defeat of that proposition will improve the life, socially and economically, of the average California citizen. I emphasize the word “improve.”

From what I’ve read and understand, passage of Proposition 64 will does neither. It is as Rhee writes: A lot of people are poised to make a lot of money. Vote No on Proposition 64.

Dennis A. Hunter,

Sacramento

Base cannabis DUI laws on science

Re “Pot critics focus on driving while stoned” (Page 7A, Aug. 31): Legalizing marijuana threatens highway safety while increasing court congestion and costs, and state judicial systems are already overwhelmed by drug-related casework.

The evidentiary issues are serious. Unlike with alcohol, a scientifically based measure for THC impairment does not exist. THC is fat-soluble, so blood limits could remain above the legal limit for days after the user last legally smoked pot. The user would not appear stoned, but legally could still be considered impaired and presumed guilty. Devastating and long-lasting implications could result in cases such as auto accidents in which someone dies.

Clearly, more scientific research is needed in order for DUI laws to reflect actual impairment rather than best guesses. States must consider the increased costs and implications of overburdening law enforcement and the judicial system before acting too soon to legalize marijuana.

Judge Linda Chezem (ret.), Mooresville, Ind.

All parties had good intentions

Re “Transgender man denied hysterectomy at Mercy San Juan” (Local, Aug. 31): In my role as chief of staff at Mercy San Juan Medical Center, one of my duties is integrating the medical staff into the functioning of the hospital. Although our physicians, nurses and ancillary staff come from a myriad of religious and ethnic backgrounds and do not always personally agree with all ethical directives of our hospital, we nonetheless respect the institution whose facilities allow us to care for our patients.

I respect the struggle and personal courage of Evan Michael Minton. I respect Dr. Lindsey Dawson with her reputation of caring for difficult medical problems and underserved populations. I also respect the administration of MSJ that worked to find an accommodation for this patient and facilitated temporary privileges at Methodist Hospital so that surgery could proceed.

Finally, I respect the builders and supporters of MSJ who felt that religious directives can aid the spirit, which can aid in healing. If we all work together, solutions can always be found.

Dr. Steven Polansky,

Carmichael

chief of staff, Mercy San Juan Medical Center

Stop government funding to DH

The religious bias shown by the Dignity Health chain in denying Evan Michael Minton’s surgery underscores the importance of stopping government payments to a health care system that imposes religion over science.

It is wrong to say that Dignity Health’s actions don’t affect all of us. The discrimination shown by a group whose motto is “humankindness” is inexcusable.

Katy Globus, Sacramento

Justice perverted in Bera case

Re “Bera dad gets year in prison” (Page 1A, Aug. 19): To send Rep. Ami Bera’s 83-year-old father to jail is a gross miscarriage of justice. Babulal Bera’s real crime is that he lacked the sophistication to launder money the way other big donors do – set up a separate Political Action Committee uncoordinated (wink, wink) with his son’s campaign. But he didn’t play the legal shell game, so he goes to prison. This isn’t justice. It’s the opposite.

Ginger Rutland,

Sacramento

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