Golf

Making the rounds: Roseville man teaches how to read a putt like Adam Scott

Roseville’s Pete Brown may not be able to teach you how to putt like Adam Scott, shown here at the Honda Classic golf tournament, Saturday, Feb. 27, 2016, in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. But Brown may be able to teach you how to read putts like the Australian.
Roseville’s Pete Brown may not be able to teach you how to putt like Adam Scott, shown here at the Honda Classic golf tournament, Saturday, Feb. 27, 2016, in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. But Brown may be able to teach you how to read putts like the Australian. The Associated Press

Peter Brown can’t teach you how to putt like Adam Scott.

He can, however, teach you how to read putts like Scott.

If you aren’t movie-star handsome like the Australian, at least you’ll have something in common with the winner of the past two PGA Tour events and the sixth-ranked golfer in the world.

It’s been simplified so much, anyone can do it. It was designed for 8-year-olds.

Peter Brown, on the AimPoint greens-reading method

Brown, a 42-year-old Roseville resident, is a science and physical education teacher at Wilson C. Riles Middle School. During the summer and on weekends, he dons a metaphorical cape. His super power is explaining to the best players in the world and bogey golfers alike how to use their feet to gauge side slope and fingers to determine how much break to play on any putt.

That’s what Scott is doing when he’s straddling his ball and peering down his extended right arm with any number of fingers raised.

Brown is one of 20 tour-level AimPoint certified instructors in the country. AimPoint is a greens-reading method created a decade ago by Mark Sweeney, who used his background in software development to find a more scientific way to determine the break of putts.

AimPoint was highly technical and entailed charts and graphs in its infancy; it was boiled down to AimPoint Express two years ago. That’s when the use of the fingers was introduced, the technique Scott now uses.

“It’s been simplified so much, anyone can do it,” Brown said. “It was designed for 8-year-olds.”

Yet there was Scott on the 18th green Sunday at Doral’s Blue Monster sizing up a 7-foot par putt for the WGC-Cadillac Championship win and $1.6 million. He straddled his line taking one AimPoint-style look and poured the ball in the middle of the hole.

Improved pace of play is another AimPoint selling point.

“Adam Scott’s winning putt on 18 took three seconds to read,” Sweeney, who works with Scott, tweeted.

Lydia Ko, the world’s No. 1 female player, uses AimPoint. Stacy Lewis and Scott McCarron were among the first touring pros to embrace it.

Brown works with multiple PGA Tour winner Hunter Mahan and Mirim Lee, the 24th-ranked woman in the world. He works with putting instructors and high-profile caddies, including Sacramento’s John Wood, who uses AimPoint fundamentals when his player, Matt Kuchar, calls him in for a look.

Brown, a 4-handicapper, has to pinch himself when he’s at one of the handful of pro events he attends each year and is asked for input from the world’s best golfers.

“Not only do I get to meet these guys, I get to give them advice,” Brown said. “I have to contain myself: ‘Remember, you’re here as a professional.’ 

Adam Scott’s winning putt on 18 took three seconds to read.

Mark Sweeney, AimPoint creator

There are skeptics, including a few former big-name players turned broadcasters, but they’re clearly swimming against the current, considering recent results.

Brown offers AimPoint clinics at courses around Sacramento. He doesn’t play as much as he once did or would like, “because my wife counts clinics as, ‘You were at the golf course, you were playing.’ 

The price of success.

Et cetera

▪ Aaron Beverly shot an 8-under-par 64 Tuesday at Valley Hi to lead Sacramento State to victory in its invitational. The Hornets were 16 under in their final round and finished 11 strokes ahead of runner-up Campbell in the 12-team field.

▪ Sagee Palavivatana (North Highlands) has advanced to the semifinals of the San Francisco City Championship.

Steve Pajak: 916-326-5526, @Steve_Pajak

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