Sacramento Kings

NBA page revives De'Aaron Fox trade talk. Why a verified writer says it's 'fake news'

Kings guard De'Aaron Fox hangs on the rim after dunking against the Boston Celtics on March 25 at Golden 1 Center. An unverified NBA site on Twitter says the Kings are considering trading Fox.
Kings guard De'Aaron Fox hangs on the rim after dunking against the Boston Celtics on March 25 at Golden 1 Center. An unverified NBA site on Twitter says the Kings are considering trading Fox. pkitagaki@sacbee.com

It seems some rumors won't go away. According to a prominent NBA writer, the chatter is "fake" anyway.

An NBA writer is reviving talk of a deal involving the Kings and their top pick from last year's draft.

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">League sources out of Boston have informed me Danny Ainge is quietly shopping Kyrie Irving. The team I’m hearing sending the strongest package is the Sacramento Kings. Deal is centered around De’Aaron Fox and the second overall pick. <a href="https://t.co/oLw5Q8NSxw">pic.twitter.com/oLw5Q8NSxw</a></p>&mdash; Chris Collins (@ChrisCNBA) <a href="https://twitter.com/ChrisCNBA/status/1004911702310313985?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 8, 2018</a></blockquote> <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

Chris Collins, a writer for The Scoop NBA, says the Kings would send De'Aaron Fox, the team's top draft pick last year, and this year's No. 2 selection to the Celtics for Kyrie Irving, a five-time All-Star acquired by Boston last offseason in a trade that sent Isaiah Thomas to the Cleveland Cavaliers.

Rumors of a deal involving Fox and Irving, then with the Cavaliers, circulated last offseason, but were shot down by The Bee and NBC Sports Bay Area.

As for the new talk, Duncan Smith is having none of it — or anything the site is reporting.

Smith, a contributor for The Athletic Detroit, called The Scoop NBA "as fake as it gets."

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Just so you guys know, this account and everything associated with <a href="https://twitter.com/TheScoopNBA?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@TheScoopNBA</a> is as fake as fake gets. <a href="https://t.co/Qrhih5ZiEe">https://t.co/Qrhih5ZiEe</a></p>&mdash; Duncan Smith (@DuncanSmithNBA) <a href="https://twitter.com/DuncanSmithNBA/status/1006382861174308864?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 12, 2018</a></blockquote> <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

He may be right. The Scoop NBA, which shows to be based out of Boston, is unverified by Twitter, had less than 400 followers as of 10:15 p.m. Monday and the earliest tweet found is dated June 9 — even though the page shows an activation date of March 2016. Also, no website for the company was found.

Collins' page had just 63 followers. Also, before June 7, there were no NBA-related tweets. However, there were multiple posts about Harambe, the gorilla killed at a Cincinnati zoo after a young boy made his way into the enclosure.

In contrast, Smith's verified Twitter account has more than 9,400 followers and has been online since May 2009.

The back-and-forth between Smith and The Scoop NBA on Twitter began Monday night. There are multiple tweets between the two pages, with Smith ultimately calling the site "fake news."

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">It’s not tough outing fake news. It’s pretty easy. <a href="https://t.co/sU6WHtAvO5">https://t.co/sU6WHtAvO5</a></p>&mdash; Duncan Smith (@DuncanSmithNBA) <a href="https://twitter.com/DuncanSmithNBA/status/1006387538901299200?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 12, 2018</a></blockquote> <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

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