San Francisco 49ers

Colin Kaepernick’s choice in the presidential election: No one

Colin Kaepernick, whose national anthem protest made waves in the run-up to the U.S. Presidential election, said he was not going to vote.
Colin Kaepernick, whose national anthem protest made waves in the run-up to the U.S. Presidential election, said he was not going to vote. The Bee

Donald Trump, who this year suggested Colin Kaepernick “find a country that works better for him,” did not get the 49ers quarterback’s vote.

Neither did his opponent, Hillary Clinton.

Kaepernick said Tuesday he wasn’t going to vote, which might not be a surprise given what he’s said about the major party candidates in recent months.

“Both are proven liars, and it almost seems like they’re trying to debate who’s less racist,” he said in September. “At this point – talking to one of my friends – you have to pick the lesser of two evils. But in the end, it’s still evil.”

Kaepernick’s national anthem protest, which began in August, caught Trump’s attention the following month, which is why he suggested Kaepernick find a new country.

“It’s a very ignorant statement that if you don’t agree with what’s going on here and that if you want justice and liberty and freedom for all, you should leave the country,” Kaepernick said in response. “He always says, ‘Make America great again.’ Well, America has never been great for people of color. That’s something that needs to be addressed. Let’s make America great for the first time.”

Kaepernick has knelt during the national anthem since the start of the preseason, and teammates Eric Reid and Eli Harold have joined him throughout the regular season. The group hopes to highlight racial inequities in this country, particularly issues involving minorities and law enforcement. Five other 49ers have raised their right fists during the anthem this year in solidarity with Kaepernick, although that number dwindled to two before Sunday’s game against the New Orleans Saints.

Kaepernick has vowed to donate $1 million to groups that address issues that concern him, and during the bye week he hosted a “Know Your Rights” camp in Oakland for underprivileged children in the area. The gathering addressed police brutality concerns but also gave advice on education, finances and health and fitness.

On social media, several 49ers fans noted that while the presidential candidates might not appeal to Kaepernick, this year’s California ballot includes several state and local races, as well as measures on everything from the death penalty to health care for seniors, children and low-income families.

Matt Barrows: @mattbarrows, read more about the team at sacbee.com/sf49ers.

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