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  • How loss of oak trees could lead to 'the end of our way of life'

    Rancher Neil Heaton talks about large-scale oak tree removal and other work on property owned by The Wonderful Company and managed by Justin Vineyards near Paso Robles. "This development, if allowed to continue, will mean the end of our way of life," he says.

Rancher Neil Heaton talks about large-scale oak tree removal and other work on property owned by The Wonderful Company and managed by Justin Vineyards near Paso Robles. "This development, if allowed to continue, will mean the end of our way of life," he says. David Middlecamp dmiddlecamp@thetribunenews.com
Rancher Neil Heaton talks about large-scale oak tree removal and other work on property owned by The Wonderful Company and managed by Justin Vineyards near Paso Robles. "This development, if allowed to continue, will mean the end of our way of life," he says. David Middlecamp dmiddlecamp@thetribunenews.com

Restaurants yank popular wine over environmental controversy

June 19, 2016 12:59 PM

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