Ben Houlton, Ph.D, Director of the John Muir Institute of the Environment in a Center for Watershed Sciences lab at UC Davis in Davis on Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2017. A Trump administration could set back California scientific research in three big ways: By curtailing federal research grants that recently have funded ground-level environmental plans, by nixing regulations favored by California agencies like the Air Resources Board and by making it more difficult for scientists to access climate data from NASA that they've relied on.
Ben Houlton, Ph.D, Director of the John Muir Institute of the Environment in a Center for Watershed Sciences lab at UC Davis in Davis on Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2017. A Trump administration could set back California scientific research in three big ways: By curtailing federal research grants that recently have funded ground-level environmental plans, by nixing regulations favored by California agencies like the Air Resources Board and by making it more difficult for scientists to access climate data from NASA that they've relied on. Randall Benton rbenton@sacbee.com
Ben Houlton, Ph.D, Director of the John Muir Institute of the Environment in a Center for Watershed Sciences lab at UC Davis in Davis on Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2017. A Trump administration could set back California scientific research in three big ways: By curtailing federal research grants that recently have funded ground-level environmental plans, by nixing regulations favored by California agencies like the Air Resources Board and by making it more difficult for scientists to access climate data from NASA that they've relied on. Randall Benton rbenton@sacbee.com
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Do they need a ‘damn satellite’? Why Trump worries California scientists

January 13, 2017 03:00 PM