State Auditor Elaine Howle presents findings to the Joint Legislative Audit Committee at the California state Capitol in 2011. A decision by the California Department of Justice to stop providing social services sentencing and conviction information considered valuable in determining whether people with criminal histories can work in licensed facilities could be putting children, adults and elderly clients at risk, according to a state audit released Tuesday.
State Auditor Elaine Howle presents findings to the Joint Legislative Audit Committee at the California state Capitol in 2011. A decision by the California Department of Justice to stop providing social services sentencing and conviction information considered valuable in determining whether people with criminal histories can work in licensed facilities could be putting children, adults and elderly clients at risk, according to a state audit released Tuesday. Autumn Payne Sacramento Bee file
State Auditor Elaine Howle presents findings to the Joint Legislative Audit Committee at the California state Capitol in 2011. A decision by the California Department of Justice to stop providing social services sentencing and conviction information considered valuable in determining whether people with criminal histories can work in licensed facilities could be putting children, adults and elderly clients at risk, according to a state audit released Tuesday. Autumn Payne Sacramento Bee file
Capitol Alert

Capitol Alert

The go-to source for news on California policy and politics

Audit slams California agencies for lax social service background checks

March 14, 2017 10:52 AM

UPDATED March 15, 2017 07:48 AM

Comments

More Videos

  • Alex Padilla on sexual harassment allegations at the Capitol

    California Secretary of State Alex Padilla says "we have more work to do" to change the culture that allows sexual harassment and abuse. He was interviewed Tuesday night at the California Hall of Fame ceremonies.