Farmworkers cut the shoots from undesirable rootstocks on a pomegranate tree in Mendota. Most land fallowed in California’s four-year drought had been devoted to crops such as hay and wheat that do not require a lot of workers. Vegetables, nuts and berries, which require more workers, have increased in production.
Farmworkers cut the shoots from undesirable rootstocks on a pomegranate tree in Mendota. Most land fallowed in California’s four-year drought had been devoted to crops such as hay and wheat that do not require a lot of workers. Vegetables, nuts and berries, which require more workers, have increased in production. Hector Amezcua hamezcua@sacbee.com
Farmworkers cut the shoots from undesirable rootstocks on a pomegranate tree in Mendota. Most land fallowed in California’s four-year drought had been devoted to crops such as hay and wheat that do not require a lot of workers. Vegetables, nuts and berries, which require more workers, have increased in production. Hector Amezcua hamezcua@sacbee.com

California farms added workers in 2014, even amid drought

May 19, 2015 5:01 PM

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