Lake Shasta and Northern California’s other largest reservoirs, Oroville and Trinity, account for almost a quarter of the state’s surface water supplies. Combined, they can hold more than 10.5 million acre feet – or 3.4 trillion gallons – of rainwater and snowmelt. To put that in perspective, the city of Sacramento in 2014 used just 94,000 acre-feet.
Lake Shasta and Northern California’s other largest reservoirs, Oroville and Trinity, account for almost a quarter of the state’s surface water supplies. Combined, they can hold more than 10.5 million acre feet – or 3.4 trillion gallons – of rainwater and snowmelt. To put that in perspective, the city of Sacramento in 2014 used just 94,000 acre-feet. Greg Barnette Redding Record Searchlight file
Lake Shasta and Northern California’s other largest reservoirs, Oroville and Trinity, account for almost a quarter of the state’s surface water supplies. Combined, they can hold more than 10.5 million acre feet – or 3.4 trillion gallons – of rainwater and snowmelt. To put that in perspective, the city of Sacramento in 2014 used just 94,000 acre-feet. Greg Barnette Redding Record Searchlight file

California’s federal reservoirs even lower than last year

October 06, 2015 1:05 PM

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