A new study funded by the National Institutes of Health found that a 2008 ordinance in Los Angeles that restricted opening new fast-food restaurants in low-income communities largely failed to change eating habits or reduce obesity rates.
A new study funded by the National Institutes of Health found that a 2008 ordinance in Los Angeles that restricted opening new fast-food restaurants in low-income communities largely failed to change eating habits or reduce obesity rates. Nam Y. Huh The Associated Press
A new study funded by the National Institutes of Health found that a 2008 ordinance in Los Angeles that restricted opening new fast-food restaurants in low-income communities largely failed to change eating habits or reduce obesity rates. Nam Y. Huh The Associated Press

Restricting fast food joints is no silver bullet for obesity epidemic

March 26, 2015 5:00 AM

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