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Divide and conquer your perennial garden

Swirling Spider daylilies burst with color at Amador Flower Farm in Plymouth. Now is the time to dig up and divide daylilies, a task that’s usually done every three years.
Swirling Spider daylilies burst with color at Amador Flower Farm in Plymouth. Now is the time to dig up and divide daylilies, a task that’s usually done every three years. Randy Pench

How do you multiply “free” plants in your garden? Do some division.

September is the right time for this task, which usually should be done every three years to keep perennials healthy and blooming. Dig, divide and replant overgrown perennials such as daylilies and Shasta daisies as they finish blooming. Divide and replant bearded irises, too. Before replanting, weed and amend the flower beds with compost or other organic fertilizer.

Elsewhere in the garden:

▪ Keep harvesting tomatoes, peppers, squash, melons and eggplant to stretch out the summer harvest.

▪ Recycle your garden leftovers. Compost annuals and vegetable crops that have finished producing.

▪ Fertilize deciduous fruit trees. Pick up any fallen fruit to cut down on the spread of pests and disease.

▪ Plant onions, lettuce, peas, radishes, turnips, beets, carrots and potatoes directly into the vegetable beds.

▪  Transplant cabbage, broccoli, kale, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower and lettuce seedlings.

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