Home & Garden

Water-wise tip: Go for drought-tolerant plants

Bush germander (Teucrium fruticans) is a UC Davis Arboretum All-Star  shrub with no known pest or disease problems. It’s equally at home in sun or shade, and it’s also drought-tolerant.
Bush germander (Teucrium fruticans) is a UC Davis Arboretum All-Star shrub with no known pest or disease problems. It’s equally at home in sun or shade, and it’s also drought-tolerant. Special to The Bee

This is part of a weekly feature in Home & Garden, highlighting ways residents can save water.

▪ Plant drought-resistant trees, shrubs and perennials.

Fall is the best time to transplant large plants such as trees or shrubs as well as many perennials that go dormant over the winter. The soil is still warm, prompting root development. Those new roots will help the transplant survive dry months to come next summer.

To get them started, give them a deep soaking and water at least once a week until (hopefully) winter rains take over. Although these transplants will need a little extra water now, they’ll save a lot in months and years to come. On average, water-wise landscaping saves 30 to 60 gallons per 1,000 square feet every time you irrigate. That adds up to 3,000 to 6,000 gallons in potential water savings a year.

For more tips, visit www.bewatersmart.info.

Debbie Arrington

  Comments