Pets

South Korean dogs adjust to life in Sacramento

Staff and volunteers play with the rescued South Korean dogs to help acclimate them to humans and human touch shortly after they arrived at the Sacramento SPCA campus on Friday. The dogs were rescued from a South Korean dog farm where they were slated to be slaughtered for meat markets. Humane Society International intervened to save the dogs and help the farmer transition to growing crops instead.
Staff and volunteers play with the rescued South Korean dogs to help acclimate them to humans and human touch shortly after they arrived at the Sacramento SPCA campus on Friday. The dogs were rescued from a South Korean dog farm where they were slated to be slaughtered for meat markets. Humane Society International intervened to save the dogs and help the farmer transition to growing crops instead. bnguyen@sacbee.com

The 10 dogs rescued from a South Korean meat farm are adjusting to life in Sacramento.

While the last few days have been something of a shock for the animals, Sacramento SPCA chief executive officer Rick Johnson said four puppies and two small dogs will be ready for adoption Thursday morning. Those dogs were deemed ready for adoption based on their age and ability to adapt to new surroundings.

Four older dogs will first be placed in foster homes because they require more care and training.

“The puppies are doing great,” Johnson said. “With the adult dogs, all this human contact, noise and different setting has been a bit of a challenge.”

The 10 dogs were part of a contingent of 57 dogs sent to Northern California that were rescued from a rural South Korean meat farm by Humane Society International. In some Korean circles, dog meat is a delicacy, but the practice is not considered mainstream.

Humane Society International agreed to pay the meat farmer about $33,000 in exchange for transitioning to crops.

The dogs have received plenty of love and attention at the Sacramento SPCA since their arrival last week. Staff regularly bond with the animals and take them for walks. One interesting habit of the older dogs, Johnson said, is their tendency to get away.

“The older dogs have preconceived notions of humans. Most of the humans they have seen over the (past) couple of years have not touched them,” Johnson said. “They are a little fearful.”

Last week, Gibson, a large brown mastiff, wouldn’t budge from his kennel after arriving at the SPCA. Not even a bacon treat could tempt him to leave. Gibson eventually came out on his own accord when there was less noise and fewer people, Johnson said.

“It just takes more time,” he added.

The 3-month-old puppies will be placed in adoptive homes on a first-come, first-serve basis Thursday at 11 a.m. They are jindos. A Chihuahua and poodle mix are also available.

SPCA officials expect dozens of people to line up based on the tremendous response and interest they’ve received. There are no special criteria for adopting the South Korean dogs as opposed to any other animal at the facility.

Johnson said they will look for owners who have time to train the puppies and keep them as a “member of the family.”

“That first year is really important to have somebody around until your dog is well trained,” he said.

Call The Bee’s Richard Chang at (916) 321-1018. Follow him on Twitter @RichardYChang.

Rescued dogs up for adoption

When: Thursday , 11 a.m.

Where: Sacramento SPCA, 6201 Florin Perkins Road, Sacramento

Phone: (916) 383-7387

Website: www.sspca.org/adopt

Related stories from Sacramento Bee

  Comments