Pets

As temperatures rise, keep your pups (and kids) safe

Hot weather puts kids, pets in peril

Meridian Fire Department demonstrates hot cars can get warm enough in a summer day to bake cookies. Never leave a child or pet alone in a vehicle, as the temperature inside can easily rise beyond 100 degrees.
Up Next
Meridian Fire Department demonstrates hot cars can get warm enough in a summer day to bake cookies. Never leave a child or pet alone in a vehicle, as the temperature inside can easily rise beyond 100 degrees.

PETA is urging owners to not leave their pets in their vehicles as temperatures continue to rise this summer.

There have been at least 64 hot weather-related animal deaths reported this year, and a dog was just rescued from a car in Elk Grove on Thursday, the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals said in a news release.

Cracking the windows has essentially no effect on lowering the temperature inside a car, according to the release. A trapped dog can be overcome by heatstroke in just a few minutes, as temperatures inside a car parked in direct sunlight can reach 130 to 170 degrees even when the temperatures outside are only 75 to 95 degrees, PETA said.

In California, it is illegal to leave an animal unattended in a car in ways that could endanger its health or well-being. Anyone who thinks an animal’s safety is in immediate danger can take steps to rescue the animal if they contact law enforcement beforehand and remain on scene.

Assemblyman Marc Steinorth, R-Rancho Cucamonga, and others on June 13, 2017 demonstrated how to break into a hot car to free an animal at risk from heat-related death. Steinorth's bill in 2016 allowed the break-ins under certain circumstances.

And it’s not just pets that you should keep in mind — nine children have already died in hot cars this year, according to the National Safety Council website. In 2018, a record 52 children died in hot cars, the website says.

If you see a pet left alone in a hot car, call law enforcement or animal control on the non-emergency number. The Humane Society of the United States also suggests noting the vehicle’s make, model and license number. You can also ask businesses in the vicinity to help find the vehicle’s owner by making a public announcement – many pet owners are unaware of the risk and will respond immediately, the Humane Society says.

Related stories from Sacramento Bee

Jaimie Ding, from Scripps College, is a local news reporter for The Sacramento Bee with an interest in politics and international relations. She grew up in Vancouver, Washington.

  Comments