Real Estate News

Incredible Mendocino County ranch steeped in history hits market at $12.4 million: Take a peek

The 2,780 acre Fountain Ranch, a property that stretches above the Russian River in Mendocino County and is steeped in early California history, is for sale at $12.4 million.

The main residence, called the Lake House, was built in the 1980s, according to the listing. It’s tucked among a grove of oak trees overlooking a man-made lake. Three bedrooms and five bathrooms are spread across 5,000 square feet of space and a covered heated pool is connected to the home.

Two other houses built in the 1990s and 1940s, respectively, are on the property and could serve as places for guests or workers. The older house is 1,200 square feet and was renovated in the 1990s. It has two bedrooms and one bath. The house built in 1990s is 1,500 square feet has three bedrooms and two baths.

Listing agent Jim Martin of California Outdoor Properties told sfgate.com that several major wine makers have expressed interest in the property since it hit the market in March.

For the past 70 years, the ranch has been used primarily as a cattle ranch. “This would be something the new owner might continue on his own or lease out to another livestock producer,” the property listing states.

“The family members are going in different directions,” Martin told sfgate.com. “They’ve had it for 70 years and they feel it’s time someone take over and continue their stewardship.”

The property listing reads: “What seems like the most economically productive use of the ranch, with the highest potential return, would be to use the existing water resources to plant a portion of the ranch to vineyards (while) simultaneously maintaining the cattle and hunting operation on the remainder.”

A video above shows the land. A full version of the video can be seen here.

The land is near Hopland, CA., about 100 miles from San Francisco. It is part of the ancient folklore of Native Americans, according to the listing. The ranch’s Frog Woman Rock is the origin of some of the most fabled tales of the Pomo Indians. The name Frog Woman Rock came from a legend of a man-eating creature, part frog and part woman, who lived in a cave in the face of the rock, according to the Santa Rosa Press Democrat.

In the 1800s, the Spanish recognized the natural richness of the region and created the Sanel Land Grant, deeding it to Fernando Feliz.

Afterward, a Victorian was built on the ranch’s north side. It still contains the grand bed that President William McKinley slept in on his tour through the region in the late 1890s.

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