Capitol Alert

Out-of-district money flows into effort to oust Democratic senator

Josh Newman supports ballot measure to protect gas tax money

Sen. Josh Newman, D-Fullerton, on April 6, 2017 spoke in support of Assembly Constitutional Amendment 5, which would guarantee that the gas tax and vehicle fee increase he and other lawmakers approved must be used for transportation projects.
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Sen. Josh Newman, D-Fullerton, on April 6, 2017 spoke in support of Assembly Constitutional Amendment 5, which would guarantee that the gas tax and vehicle fee increase he and other lawmakers approved must be used for transportation projects.

If a measure to recall state Sen. Josh Newman ever qualifies for the ballot, donors from outside the Fullerton Democrat’s district will have had a major part in making it happen.

Campaign filings by the main pro-recall campaign committee make clear that the effort to oust the Fullerton Democrat so far has a heavy San Diego flavor.

Of the more than $44,000 in contributions reported by the Reform California committee since early April, at least $29,000 has come from donors in San Diego County, where recall leader Carl DeMaio, a former city councilman and congressional candidate, hosts a radio show, according to a pair of filings by the committee in recent days.

About $2,000 has been raised by donors listing residences within Newman’s 29th Senate District, the filings show.

SD-29 

Newman narrowly defeated his GOP opponent last November in an area that has long been represented by Republicans. Recall supporters have linked the effort to Newman’s support of a 10-year, $52 billion road-funding package that will increase fuel and vehicle charges. Newman and his backers label the recall push a power grab and waste of taxpayer money.

Reform California and the California Republican Party have reported almost $408,000 in outside spending to gather the nearly 63,600 valid voter signatures to qualify a recall election and other costs. The state GOP has raised tens of thousands of dollars since early April, according to state filings.

Sen. Josh Newman, D-Fullerton, explains why he used unconventional tactics in his underdog campaign for the 29th Senate District.

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