Capitol Alert

AM Alert: Jerry Brown, climate change and public opinion

Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr., left, listens to Senate President pro Tempore Kevin de León announce they will abandon efforts this year to require a 50 percent reduction in petroleum use in motor vehicles by 2050 at the State Capitol Wednesday September 9, 2015 in Sacramento, Calif.
Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr., left, listens to Senate President pro Tempore Kevin de León announce they will abandon efforts this year to require a 50 percent reduction in petroleum use in motor vehicles by 2050 at the State Capitol Wednesday September 9, 2015 in Sacramento, Calif. pkitagaki@sacbee.com

Climate change has sat squarely at the center of Gov. Jerry Brown’s record fourth term.

Soon Brown will be in Paris to rub elbows with world leaders and promote California’s climate agenda-setting through state policies and nonbinding pacts.

But while the push to limit carbon emissions has gained traction in California, it has failed to take hold nationally, facing resistance from politicians for whom Brown has had some choice words while demanding action. A UC Center Sacramento talk today by Stanford researcher Jon Krosnick will explore how Americans view the science on climate change and why that hasn’t translated into a broader policy response. From noon to 1:30 p.m. at 1130 K Street.

And despite his recent rhetorical attacks on oil industry influence, Brown still hasn’t earned the trust of some environmentalists. He’s faced heat over revelations he had regulators prospect his land for oil and gas and rebuffed an oil extraction tax pushed by liberal legislators and a certain wealthy political player. Today, anti-fracking activists will continue their crusade to have Brown ban the controversial oil drilling technique during an 11 a.m. rally on the west steps.

HOUSE ARE WE? California’s housing crunch continues to bedevil lawmakers, with bills to enact a dedicated affordable housing fee and to expand a housing tax credit failing to secure an Assembly floor vote and dying by veto, respectively. Today the Senate Housing and Transportation Committee will examine why housing is so expensive in California and how the state can build more affordable housing despite a lack of redevelopment money, drawing on Sen. Jim Beall, D-San Jose, as well as U.S. Reps Zoe Lofgren and Anna Eshoo. The hearing is in San Jose, but you can watch here starting at 9 a.m.

LOCK AND KEY: While California has been working to reduce a prison population deemed unconstitutionally massive, it has also been spending money to build more jails. Today the Board of State and Community Corrections is scheduled to approve around $500 million, allocated in a 2014 budget bill, on 15 facilities across the state. Anti-incarceration activists will protest at the 10 a.m. meeting.

EDUCATIONAL: Annual battles over school funding, the implementation of Common Core standards and the appropriate response to a court ruling nixing California teacher employment rules are but a few of the reasons schools remain a regular hot topic in Sacramento. Teachers unions, charter school operators and school reformers will all be represented and discussing the issues at a Capitol Weekly-sponsored education conference today, as will august Bee columnist Dan Walters. From 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at 1231 I Street.

Jeremy B. White: 916-326-5543, @CapitolAlert

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