Capitol Alert

AM Alert: Obama, Brown visit Lake Tahoe on last day of session

President Barack Obama, left, talks about drought issues with California Gov. Jerry Brown, center, and Sen. Barbara Boxer during a 2014 roundtable meeting near Los Banos. All three leaders will be attending an annual summit at Lake Tahoe Wednesday.
President Barack Obama, left, talks about drought issues with California Gov. Jerry Brown, center, and Sen. Barbara Boxer during a 2014 roundtable meeting near Los Banos. All three leaders will be attending an annual summit at Lake Tahoe Wednesday. AP

While the Legislature gears up for its final day of the 2015-16 session, President Barack Obama, Gov. Jerry Brown and U.S. Sens. Barbara Boxer and Dianne Feinstein will gather at Lake Tahoe for the 20th annual summit on the restoration of the lake.

The gathering comes at a precarious time for the lake, which became warmer and cloudier last year, according to researchers at the University of California, Davis.

The lake’s average surface temperature last year was 53.3 degrees, the warmest on record, and the threat of erosion, wildfire and climate change linger.

If the environmental challenges are significant, funding obstacles appear no easier to overcome. California and Nevada senators have been pushing for years to renew the Lake Tahoe Restoration Act, which expired in 2010, seeking millions of dollars to pay for restoration and wildfire prevention projects in the area.

Tickets to the summit, at Harveys Lake Tahoe Hotel and Casino Outdoor Arena, sold out after Obama’s participation was announced. Also performing – The Killers.

THE FINAL COUNTDOWN: It’s the last day of the legislative session and it may not be a long one. The possibility of an early adjournment underlines an end-of-session that has been relatively mellow, barring a few legislative skirmishes over climate change and farmworkers overtime.

One of the more controversial bills of the year, a family-leave measure by Hannah-Beth Jackson , D-Santa Barbara, labeled a “job killer” by opponents, cleared the Assembly on a narrow 43-15 vote Tuesday. Another contentious bill, dealing with short-lived climate pollutants, by Sen. Ricardo Lara, D-Bell Gardens, has yet to be taken up.

A deal on affordable housing was declared “dead” by Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon, D-Paramount, earlier this month. The special session on transportation was convened briefly on the Assembly floor Tuesday, but no action was taken and none is likely unless lawmakers return to the Capitol before Nov. 30.

BY THE NUMBERS: The November campaign for a $9 billion statewide school bond reported $175,000 in contributions Monday. The haul included $75,000 from the California American Council of Engineering Companies and $100,00 from Michael T. Hayde, the chairman of Western National Group, a real estate company. All told, Proposition 51 proponents have raised almost $9 million.

See more at The Money Trail.

WORTH REPEATING: “Focus on your seat – don’t take it for granted.”

-Jon Fleischman, Republican blogger, advising California GOP officeholders seeking re-election with Donald Trump leading the ticket and no Republican U.S. Senate candidate on the ballot.

VIDEO: Central Valley lawmakers give opposing arguments on farmworker overtime bill

HAPPENING AT THE CAPITOL: Members of the “Fed Up!” coalition, an advocacy group seeking federal action on opioid addiction, is holding a rally on the north Capitol steps to observe International Overdose Awareness Day.

“We’re recognizing the 150 people a day that are lost because of an overdose or overdose-related death,” said Sandra Chavez, outreach director for the National Coalition Against Prescription Drug Abuse, one of the Fed Up! member organizations.

Chavez said 100 people are expected to attend the event, which will include the reading of a letter from President Obama. There will also be trainings on how to properly administer Narcan, an overdose prevention drug.

Chavez said the groups will also call on Gov. Jerry Brown to sign Senate Bill 482, also authored by Lara, that would require doctors to consult a patient history database before prescribing certain controlled drugs. The Assembly passed the bill last week after the Senate approved it last May.

David Siders and Jim Miller of the Bee’s Capitol Bureau contributed to this report.

Anshu Siripurapu: 916-321-1060, @AnshuSiripurapu

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