California

Raid finds $2.7 million in illegal pot — and one puppy. A cop’s giving him a new home

A raid at a Santa Barbara, California, marijuana grow turned up a 3-month-old puppy who’d been abandoned amid a mess of fertilizer and toxic chemicals, deputies say. Now a detective on the raid’s adopting him.
A raid at a Santa Barbara, California, marijuana grow turned up a 3-month-old puppy who’d been abandoned amid a mess of fertilizer and toxic chemicals, deputies say. Now a detective on the raid’s adopting him. Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Department

A pot raid near Santa Barbara, California, turned up the targeted illegal marijuana — $2.7 million worth, reported KTLA. Then detectives found something they didn’t expect.

“A small puppy was located lying on a pile of plastic surrounded by fertilizers and hazardous chemicals,” the Santa Barbara Sheriff’s Department wrote on Facebook. “The puppy was slow to respond and lethargic.”

The 3-month-old puppy had been abandoned with no food or water in 90-degree heat at the remote Cuyama Valley grow, sheriff’s officials wrote.

Concerned for the puppy’s health, deputies and detectives secured permission for a helicopter assisting with the Sept. 28 raid to airlift the pup to the Santa Maria Animal Center, reported the Facebook post.

After an overnight visit to the veterinarian, he returned as “a bright, playful, happy 3-month-old puppy,” said Stacy Silva of the animal center, according to the Facebook post.

One of the detectives on the raid, whose name was not released because of his sensitive position, will be adopting the puppy, sheriff’s officials said.

“This little guy made quite the impression on every detective and deputy on scene,” the detective said, according to the Facebook post. “He is a little fighter and has quite the story to tell. I am excited to give him the home he deserves.”

The puppy has not been given a name yet.

A day or two in the life of K9 Drago, Placer County Sheriff's Office police dog - hopping in Folsom Lake, getting a bath. It's a good life when he's not chasing criminals.

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