California

See it: Largest land offering in California—50,000 acres in Bay Area— hits market at $72 million

This is the largest land offering in California: 50,500 acres for $72 million

The N3 Cattle Company ranch spans 50,500 acres in the Bay Area and is for sale at $72 million.
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The N3 Cattle Company ranch spans 50,500 acres in the Bay Area and is for sale at $72 million.

A massive, unspoiled property in the Bay Area that stretches over 50,500 acres has hit the market for $72 million.

The N3 Cattle Company is for sale for the first time in 85 years. Spanning four counties, it’s the largest land offering in California, according to listing agent Todd Renfrew of California Outdoor Properties.

Located just south of Livermore, and east of Oakland and San Jose, the extremely private and wild land encompasses 80 square miles, bigger that the nearby city of San Francisco.

The ranch sits as it has for hundreds of years, according to the California Outdoor Properties listing.

“It’s pretty much untouched,” Renfrew said. “It’s what it looked like 1,000 years ago.”

The property features include diverse terrain, vegetation and important watersheds and creeks. The working ranch has a 4-bedroom main house, a bedroom annex, bunk house, horse barn, shops, four cabins for employee housing and an additional 14 hunting cabins.

There are 200 miles of private roads for hiking, trail running, mountain biking, hunting and riding ATVs.

The property is home to lots of wildlife, such as elk, deer, pigs, mountain lions, bobcats, coyotes, quail, turkey and doves.

The sellers are two sisters, Sandra Naftzger and Natalie Naftzger Davis, who are fourth-generation ranchers, Renfrew said.

Renfrew said the siblings have been operating the ranch for the past 20 years.

“My father was all business,” Sandra Naftzger told the Wall Street Journal. “We were always taught to be respectful of the cattle operation. We’d be spending time with the managers and the buckaroos. It takes a village.”

The property is under the Williamson Act, meaning the land will not be developed or otherwise converted to another use for a number of years.



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