Fires

Map shows risk of debris flows in Camp Fire burn area

‘I would leave.’ When rains come, here’s the risk burned California areas face

Areas in Shasta County burned by the Carr Fire in 2018 are prone to another risk when the rainy season starts. Scientists explain why wildfire-burned hillsides can't absorb as much water, and why debris flows and flooding are more likely to happen.
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Areas in Shasta County burned by the Carr Fire in 2018 are prone to another risk when the rainy season starts. Scientists explain why wildfire-burned hillsides can't absorb as much water, and why debris flows and flooding are more likely to happen.

With rains expected in fire areas this week, six separate agencies have issued public flash flood alerts since Monday for the mountains around the still-burning Camp Fire in Butte County. Included is a stark warning from the state Department of Conservation that debris flows can be up to 50-feet deep and run at 30 miles per hour.

PARADISE DEBRIS FLOW RISK

Federal geologists have put together a preliminary map of where debris flows are most likely to occur in the Camp Fire area during intense rains. This map shows the likelihood of a debris flow in a storm with a peak 15-minute intensity of one inch per hour.
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Map: Nathaniel Levine • Source: U.S. Geological Survey

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