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Mid-80s weather returns to Sacramento. What’s in store for Tahoe and the foothills?

Watch: They’re working hard blowing 8 feet of snow off Tioga Road near Yosemite

Road crews are working on Tioga Road about one mile west of White Wolf in about eight feet of snow, in this video shot May 3, 2019. Too deep for the rotary plows, a dozer goes out ahead to remove some snow so the rotary plows can get to work.
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Road crews are working on Tioga Road about one mile west of White Wolf in about eight feet of snow, in this video shot May 3, 2019. Too deep for the rotary plows, a dozer goes out ahead to remove some snow so the rotary plows can get to work.

While Sacramento warms back up this week, thunderstorms could loom in other parts of Northern California.

Sacramento’s high of 78 degrees in Tuesday’s forecast will jump up to 84 by Wednesday, and remain in the low- to mid-80s through the weekend.

The mountains, foothills and parts of the northern Sacramento Valley will see the possibility of afternoon or evening thunderstorms most of the week, according to the National Weather Service. High temperatures in the foothills will range between the mid-70s and mid-80s, while the mountains will vary from the 50s through 70s.

Forecasters warn that isolated thunderstorms along the Sierra could bring frequent lightning, hail, heavy rain and gusty winds.

Thunderstorms already brought a downpour to Plumas County on Monday, prompting a brief weather advisory of flood risk and dime-sized hail, according to NWS. That advisory expired at 6:15 p.m. with no flood incidents reported.

Forecasts also indicate a slight chance of thunderstorms Thursday evening in Sacramento.

As noted Sunday and Monday by NWS Sacramento on Twitter, the thunderstorms seen in the mountains have traveled east to west, against the norm. This was due to counterclockwise wind flows created by a low-pressure system.

Satellite images show wispy stratus clouds pouring over the northern Sierra and Lake Tahoe on Monday, while fog left the Bay Area and entered the Central Valley.

Are you curious about thunderstorms and tornadoes in California? Brooke Bingaman, metereologist at the National Weather Service Sacramento, offers an explanation of why it happens.

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Michael McGough anchors The Sacramento Bee’s breaking news reporting team, covering public safety and other local stories. A Sacramento native and lifelong capital resident, he interned at The Bee while attending Sacramento State, where he earned a degree in journalism.


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