Letters to the Editor

Fake news and the dumbing-down of America

Flowers and notes left by well-wishers are displayed outside Comet Ping Pong, a pizza restaurant in Washington, D.C., that has been the target of fake news stories linking it to a child sex trafficking ring.
Flowers and notes left by well-wishers are displayed outside Comet Ping Pong, a pizza restaurant in Washington, D.C., that has been the target of fake news stories linking it to a child sex trafficking ring. The Associated Press

The dumbing-down of America

Re “You think you can recognize fake news? So does most of the country.” (Sacbee.com, Dec. 15): This fake news epidemic is attributed to people relying solely on their electronic devices and the internet for news. What happened to society supposedly getting smarter with technology?

Common sense used to prevail, and aside from that most scurrilous internet headlines can be easily confirmed or debunked. It now appears that people are too busy or too lazy to verify, but more eager to share and spread the harmful fakery.

This dumbing-down of America is a sad commentary on our times and our future.

Stephen Farr, Folsom

Tillerson is focused on profits

Re “Tillerson should get scrutiny” (Editorials, Dec. 14): Let us not forget that in 2013, CEO Rex Tillerson said in a speech to Exxon Mobil stockholders: “What good is it to save the planet if humanity suffers?” This utterly ridiculous question demonstrates his lack of basic moral values and common sense.

To protect our country, and the world, the Senate must reject this hopelessly flawed nominee for secretary of state. His conflict of interest is off the charts. Tillerson is probably thinking, “What good are human rights if I can’t make a profit?”

Steven Greco, Davis

Defending political correctness

Re “Celebrate Russians coming to U.S.” (Letters, Dec. 14): Bill Graham inadvertently shows why political correctness should be valued. Political correctness has a positive effect on our national dialogue, as well as on our personal relationships. Political correctness requires our reflection on the possible biases and prejudices behind our words. Political correctness requires us to consider how others will interpret our meaning. Political correctness provides a filter through which we show respect. Some reject this filter, and by doing so expose their biases and prejudices.

A majority of American voters rejected Donald Trump and Trumpism’s rejection of political correctness. The American majority still values respecting others.

Thomas Funk, Elk Grove

Tampering should anger us all

Re “Election truth should set you free” (Letters, Dec. 15): I think everyone should be angry at the prospect of Russian hackers attempting to influence the election, whether they actually did it or not. Anything less would be unpatriotic. Bill Jurkovitch suggested the Russians did us a favor. Does he think they uncovered some previously unknown corruption, and now everything is going to be just great?

David Zierten, Carmichael

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