Baseball

Baseball celebrates 10-year fight against cancer. Why it means a lot to Rhys Hoskins

Philadelphia Phillies’ Rhys Hoskins is among Major League Baseball players and fans of the game celebrating the league’s 10-year anniversary with Stand Up To Cancer.
Philadelphia Phillies’ Rhys Hoskins is among Major League Baseball players and fans of the game celebrating the league’s 10-year anniversary with Stand Up To Cancer. AP

Ten years of partnership toward finding a cure for cancer is being celebrated Tuesday.

As this year’s MLB All-Star Game is played, the league will commemorate a decade of working with Stand Up To Cancer, also known as SU2C. During the partnership, more than $43 million has been raised to fight the disease.

The league has held a “placard moment” at each All-Star Game and during the World Series. Players and fans stand with a card to raise awareness to SU2C.

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One major leaguer who has been affected by cancer is Philadelphia Phillies slugger Rhys Hoskins. The Sacramento State and Jesuit High product, who lost his mother to cancer as a teenager, is proud of what the organizations have been able to build over the last 10 years.

“To know that the sport of baseball shows a tremendous amount of support of the general fight against cancer is awesome,” Hoskins said. “To see such a big and influential group come together as one is powerful. MLB and Stand Up To Cancer prove that there is strength in numbers, and it is very comforting to know the league supports those who have lost loved ones to this terrible disease.

“I get a little bit emotional inside every time I see the placard moments. It’s such a touching moment to see stadiums full of names of those who have been affected. For those few moments, favorite memories of my mom flash through my head just as I imagine people’s memories of their loved ones are flashing through theirs.

“Organizations like Stand Up To Cancer are important to me because, first and foremost, they raise awareness and inform people on all of the different types of cancer, what they can do and advancements in the field which is HUGE. Without information we don’t get any closer to finding a cure.”

Hoskins’ mother, Cathy Reynolds, died of breast cancer in 2009 after a 14-year fight. Hoskins turned 16 the day before her funeral, according to a report in The Bee last year.

“It’s your mom, so you never forget, and it’s the little things that pop up every day that remind me of her, something someone says that’s eerily similar to what she might say,” Hoskins said last year. “I think she’s looking down on me. I’m hoping to be a good person first. All the baseball accolades are nice, but what it comes down to, it’s that old saying: ‘What would you do if your mom was looking?’“ For me, it’s be a good person, a good man, things instilled in me by her and my dad.”

Hoskins is not in the All-Star Game, but he put on a show Monday during the T-Mobile Home Run Derby at Nationals Park despite not winning the title.

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