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  • Loss of longtime home 'devastating,' couple says

    John and Norma Cranshaw took out a subprime loan on their south Sacramento home in 2006 and later lost it to foreclosure. “They said they would be there to help us,” said John Cranshaw, 69. “Once they got the money, they were gone.”

John and Norma Cranshaw took out a subprime loan on their south Sacramento home in 2006 and later lost it to foreclosure. “They said they would be there to help us,” said John Cranshaw, 69. “Once they got the money, they were gone.” Hector Amezcua The Sacramento Bee
John and Norma Cranshaw took out a subprime loan on their south Sacramento home in 2006 and later lost it to foreclosure. “They said they would be there to help us,” said John Cranshaw, 69. “Once they got the money, they were gone.” Hector Amezcua The Sacramento Bee

Why most black Sacramentans still can’t buy a home eight years after Great Recession

April 30, 2017 04:00 AM

UPDATED May 01, 2017 12:04 PM

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More Videos

Take a look at the planned housing project at the railyard 1:03

Take a look at the planned housing project at the railyard

California new housing shortage on par with 'shrinking rust belt cities' 1:33

California new housing shortage on par with 'shrinking rust belt cities'

Get up close and personal with whales in La Jolla 1:09

Get up close and personal with whales in La Jolla

Jimmy Garoppolo and Robbie Gould spark 49ers' third straight win 1:59

Jimmy Garoppolo and Robbie Gould spark 49ers' third straight win

Kevin de Leon says he has been 'humbled' by sexual harassment reports in the Senate 1:36

Kevin de Leon says he has been 'humbled' by sexual harassment reports in the Senate

Two suspects caught on this video of Sacramento County armed robbery now behind bars 0:36

Two suspects caught on this video of Sacramento County armed robbery now behind bars

Retired fertility doctor pleads guilty to inseminating patients with own sperm 0:51

Retired fertility doctor pleads guilty to inseminating patients with own sperm

Flooding After Fire: California Department of Water Resources explains the risk 5:46

Flooding After Fire: California Department of Water Resources explains the risk

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  • Take a look at the planned housing project at the railyard

    The first images have emerged of a six-story apartment building planned for Sacramento’s downtown railyard, likely the first major housing project to be built in the massive oasis. The project would be built close to the site of a planned 20,000-seat Major League Soccer stadium.