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  • A Horse, A Convict, A Chance for Change

    At the Wild Horse Program at Rio Cosumnes Correctional Center inmates train wild mustangs to become adoptable to the public. Through this process a deep bond forms between horse and inmate and then the possibility for transformation happens. Chris Culcasi, one of the inmates in the program, takes steps out of a criminal life toward a new future. Zephyr, the wild mustang he trained, leads a parallel path.

At the Wild Horse Program at Rio Cosumnes Correctional Center inmates train wild mustangs to become adoptable to the public. Through this process a deep bond forms between horse and inmate and then the possibility for transformation happens. Chris Culcasi, one of the inmates in the program, takes steps out of a criminal life toward a new future. Zephyr, the wild mustang he trained, leads a parallel path. Autumn Payne Sacramento Bee
At the Wild Horse Program at Rio Cosumnes Correctional Center inmates train wild mustangs to become adoptable to the public. Through this process a deep bond forms between horse and inmate and then the possibility for transformation happens. Chris Culcasi, one of the inmates in the program, takes steps out of a criminal life toward a new future. Zephyr, the wild mustang he trained, leads a parallel path. Autumn Payne Sacramento Bee

A troubled inmate joined a horse program to get an extra lunch. It changed his life.

August 06, 2017 3:55 AM

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