Michelle Barry was diagnosed with breast cancer when she was 41, a mother of three children who found very few women at work or among fellow mothers at her kids’ schools who could relate. Four years later, she’s rebounded, joining regular coffee meetups in Sacramento with “other people like me”: younger women with breast cancer. “It’s dedicated time to talking about and processing some of the feelings you still have,” said Barry. “Cancer never goes too far away. It’s always there below the surface.” She just participated in her fourth annual Tour de Pink, an annual 200-mile bike ride that she calls a “healing, cathartic experience,” pedaling down the California coastline with dozens of survivors, family members and friends.
Michelle Barry was diagnosed with breast cancer when she was 41, a mother of three children who found very few women at work or among fellow mothers at her kids’ schools who could relate. Four years later, she’s rebounded, joining regular coffee meetups in Sacramento with “other people like me”: younger women with breast cancer. “It’s dedicated time to talking about and processing some of the feelings you still have,” said Barry. “Cancer never goes too far away. It’s always there below the surface.” She just participated in her fourth annual Tour de Pink, an annual 200-mile bike ride that she calls a “healing, cathartic experience,” pedaling down the California coastline with dozens of survivors, family members and friends. Randy Pench rpench@sacbee.com
Michelle Barry was diagnosed with breast cancer when she was 41, a mother of three children who found very few women at work or among fellow mothers at her kids’ schools who could relate. Four years later, she’s rebounded, joining regular coffee meetups in Sacramento with “other people like me”: younger women with breast cancer. “It’s dedicated time to talking about and processing some of the feelings you still have,” said Barry. “Cancer never goes too far away. It’s always there below the surface.” She just participated in her fourth annual Tour de Pink, an annual 200-mile bike ride that she calls a “healing, cathartic experience,” pedaling down the California coastline with dozens of survivors, family members and friends. Randy Pench rpench@sacbee.com

Health & Medicine

When breast cancer hits young: Growing numbers of women in their 20s, 30s confront the disease

October 17, 2016 4:00 AM

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