Amanda Friedland, left, adjusts her friend Betsy Davis' sash as Davis lies on a bed during her "Right To Die Party" surrounded by friends and family, in Ojai. At the end of the party, the 41-year-old woman diagnosed with ALS took a cocktail of lethal drugs and died, becoming one of the first California residents to take life-ending drugs under a new law that gave such an option to the terminally ill.
Amanda Friedland, left, adjusts her friend Betsy Davis' sash as Davis lies on a bed during her "Right To Die Party" surrounded by friends and family, in Ojai. At the end of the party, the 41-year-old woman diagnosed with ALS took a cocktail of lethal drugs and died, becoming one of the first California residents to take life-ending drugs under a new law that gave such an option to the terminally ill. Niels Alpert AP file
Amanda Friedland, left, adjusts her friend Betsy Davis' sash as Davis lies on a bed during her "Right To Die Party" surrounded by friends and family, in Ojai. At the end of the party, the 41-year-old woman diagnosed with ALS took a cocktail of lethal drugs and died, becoming one of the first California residents to take life-ending drugs under a new law that gave such an option to the terminally ill. Niels Alpert AP file

Health & Medicine

111 Californians ended their lives with doctor-prescribed meds in first year of aid-in-dying law

June 27, 2017 7:03 PM

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