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On April 1, 2015, Gov. Jerry Brown attended a routine snow survey at 6,800 feet in the Sierra Nevada, near Echo Summit on Highway 50 along the road to Lake Tahoe. The April survey is an annual ritual, marking the end of the winter season, in which automated sensors and technicians in the field strive to measure how much water the state’s farms and cities will receive from snowmelt. The measurements, explained by Frank Gehrke, chief of the California cooperative snow surveys program, showed the snowpack at just 5 percent of average for April 1, 2015, well below the previous record low of 25 percent, which was reached in 2014, and in 1977. David Siders The Sacramento Bee
On April 1, 2015, Gov. Jerry Brown attended a routine snow survey at 6,800 feet in the Sierra Nevada, near Echo Summit on Highway 50 along the road to Lake Tahoe. The April survey is an annual ritual, marking the end of the winter season, in which automated sensors and technicians in the field strive to measure how much water the state’s farms and cities will receive from snowmelt. The measurements, explained by Frank Gehrke, chief of the California cooperative snow surveys program, showed the snowpack at just 5 percent of average for April 1, 2015, well below the previous record low of 25 percent, which was reached in 2014, and in 1977. David Siders The Sacramento Bee
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Capitol Alert

The go-to source for news on California policy and politics

California drought fears ease, don’t vanish, with rain

April 13, 2016 01:00 PM

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