John Rueth, assistant hatchery manager of the Livingston Stone Hatchery for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife at Shasta Dam, holds a winter run chinook salmon for measuring and tagging, which was later transferred to a holding tank where it will be artificially spawned, Wednesday, March 13, 2002.
John Rueth, assistant hatchery manager of the Livingston Stone Hatchery for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife at Shasta Dam, holds a winter run chinook salmon for measuring and tagging, which was later transferred to a holding tank where it will be artificially spawned, Wednesday, March 13, 2002. Chris Crewell Sacramento Bee file
John Rueth, assistant hatchery manager of the Livingston Stone Hatchery for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife at Shasta Dam, holds a winter run chinook salmon for measuring and tagging, which was later transferred to a holding tank where it will be artificially spawned, Wednesday, March 13, 2002. Chris Crewell Sacramento Bee file

These Chinook almost went extinct during California’s drought. Can this $100 million plan save them?

March 08, 2018 03:08 PM